more the merrier, the

the more the merrier

More people will make something more enjoyable. This set phrase is used to welcome one to join a group or activity. Oh sure, you can come to the mall with us—the more the merrier!
See also: merry, more

more the merrier

Cliché the more people there are, the happier the situation will be. Of course you can have a ride with us! The more the merrier. The manager hired a new employee even though there's not enough work for all of us now. Oh, well, the more the merrier.
See also: merry, more

more the merrier, the

The larger the number involved, the better the occasion. For example, John's invited all his family to come along, and why not? The more the merrier. This expression was first recorded in 1530, when it was put as "The more the merrier; the fewer, the better fare" (meaning "with fewer there would be more to eat"), an observation that made its way into numerous proverb collections.
See also: more

the more the merrier

the more people or things there are the better a situation will be.
See also: merry, more

the ˌmore the ˈmerrier

(saying) the more people or things there are, the better the situation will be or the more fun people will have: Bring as many friends as you like to the party. The more the merrier.
See also: merry, more

more the merrier, the

The larger the number of participants, the greater the fun. This thought was expressed by Cicero, but the precise phrase first appeared in English as “The mo the meryer; the fewer, the better fare” (Jehan Palsgrave, 1530) and was credited by some to have been said first by King James I of Scotland (ca. 1423). John Heywood picked it up in his proverb collection of 1546, also indicating that “the fewer, the better fare,” meaning with fewer people there would be more for each to eat. Better fare was sometimes changed to better cheer, presumably meaning more for each to drink.
See also: more
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