more bang for the buck

more bang for (one's)/the buck

Greater value for the amount of money one is spending. It isn't one of the most popular brands, but this high-definition TV will give you way more bang for your buck.
See also: bang, buck, more

more bang for the buck

Also, more bounce for the ounce. More value for one's money, a greater return on an investment. For example, Buying a condominium is better than renting for years and years; more bang for the buck , or We always get the largest packages of dog food-more bounce for the ounce. The first term originated in the late 1960s in the military for expenditures for firepower and soon was extended to mean an increased financial return or better value. The variant originated in the mid-1900s as an advertising slogan for a carbonated soft drink.
See also: bang, buck, more
References in periodicals archive ?
A new analysis of two commercial biofuels finds that while both provide more energy than they consume, soybean biodiesel gives more bang for the buck than ethanol made from corn does.
But at a certain point cleaning tip China's and India's air will give us more bang for the buck. "Think globally, act locally" does not work when it comes to blowing in the wind.
In the hands of the right operator, that wood could get a lot more bang for the buck as ready to assemble furniture pieces, Gauvreau says.
It's a way to work more effectively together and get more bang for the buck."
Most importantly, the seller gets more bang for the buck, as the commission payable is generally the same in either an open listing or an exclusive.
Conceptualized in this way, mobility programs can only help in improving outcomes and thus getting "more bang for the buck." A sharpened focus on patients' mobility issues should be the goal of all post-acute programs.
Presented the same weekend as the Joff rey's pricey, ponderous Billboards, the sleek Acid Psalms gave more bang for the buck. Never trust anyone over thirty.