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References in classic literature ?
It was while More was about the King's business in Belgium that he wrote the greater part of the book by which he is best remembered.
When More looked round upon the England that he knew he saw many things that were wrong.
It grati- fied all the vicious vanity that was in him; and so, instead of winning him, it only "set him up" the more and made him the more diligent to avoid betraying that he knew she was about.
His conscience could not endure any more of Amy's grateful happiness, and his jealousy could bear no more of the other distress.
I'm not a-going to turn Methodist any more nor you are--though it's like enough you'll turn to something worse.
And God helps us with our headpieces and our hands as well as with our souls; and if a man does bits o' jobs out o' working hours-- builds a oven for 's wife to save her from going to the bakehouse, or scrats at his bit o' garden and makes two potatoes grow istead o' one, he's doin' more good, and he's just as near to God, as if he was running after some preacher and a-praying and a-groaning.
From the time they left me oi till they was 'tween decks, not wan av thim was more than dacintly dhrunk.
Now, you needn't be lonely any more, and I'll try to fill Archie's place till he comes back, for I know he will, as soon as you let him.
But whether it was because I had done well myself, or because I had been a witness of his own much greater prowess, is more than I can tell.
Macey, for example, coming one evening expressly to let Silas know that recent events had given him the advantage of standing more favourably in the opinion of a man whose judgment was not formed lightly, opened the conversation by saying, as soon as he had seated himself and adjusted his thumbs--
First she threw a fair clean shirt and cloak about his shoulders; then she made him younger and of more imposing presence; she gave him back his colour, filled out his cheeks, and let his beard become dark again.
I supported my poor girl to the chair, and once more I knelt before her and took her hands in mine.
I fear,' said Nicholas, shaking his head, and making an attempt to smile, 'that your better-half would be more struck with him now than ever.
Italy, like the rest of the Roman Empire, had been overrun and conquered in the fifth century by the barbarian Teutonic tribes, but the devastation had been less complete there than in the more northern lands, and there, even more, perhaps, than in France, the bulk of the people remained Latin in blood and in character.
And Simon Ockley's History of the Saracens recounts the prodigies of individual valor, with admiration all the more evident on the part of the narrator that he seems to think that his place in Christian Oxford requires of him some proper protestations of abhorrence.