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References in classic literature ?
Although he chose his wife so quaintly More's home was a very happy one.
More was a great public man, but he was first a father and head of his own house.
His conscience could not endure any more of Amy's grateful happiness, and his jealousy could bear no more of the other distress.
I'm not a-going to turn Methodist any more nor you are--though it's like enough you'll turn to something worse.
And God helps us with our headpieces and our hands as well as with our souls; and if a man does bits o' jobs out o' working hours-- builds a oven for 's wife to save her from going to the bakehouse, or scrats at his bit o' garden and makes two potatoes grow istead o' one, he's doin' more good, and he's just as near to God, as if he was running after some preacher and a-praying and a-groaning."
I've shut my eyes to a dale av dog's thricks to-day, an' now there must be no more av ut.'
Now, you needn't be lonely any more, and I'll try to fill Archie's place till he comes back, for I know he will, as soon as you let him."
"Troth and indeed, they will do him no harm; the more's the pity!
Instead of pursing the theme he had in his mind, Quilp folded his arms again, and looked at her more sternly than before, while she averted her eyes and kept them on the ground.
Macey, for example, coming one evening expressly to let Silas know that recent events had given him the advantage of standing more favourably in the opinion of a man whose judgment was not formed lightly, opened the conversation by saying, as soon as he had seated himself and adjusted his thumbs--
When I heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see you any more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a good look at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come into the country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the town generally.
I've been nursing the job all this week; had my last look round this very evening, with one of these officers, and only rode back for more to make sure of taking our gentlemen alive.
But that's feeling a part and going into it as if you meant it; it isn't usual; more's the pity.'
Italy, like the rest of the Roman Empire, had been overrun and conquered in the fifth century by the barbarian Teutonic tribes, but the devastation had been less complete there than in the more northern lands, and there, even more, perhaps, than in France, the bulk of the people remained Latin in blood and in character.
And Simon Ockley's History of the Saracens recounts the prodigies of individual valor, with admiration all the more evident on the part of the narrator that he seems to think that his place in Christian Oxford requires of him some proper protestations of abhorrence.