moral


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Related to moral: Moral development

moral compass

That which serves or guides a person's knowledge, sense, or intuition of correct virtues, morals, or ethics. Our country's moral compass has surely gone awry in recent times, as our priorities seem now to favor the wealthy accumulating more wealth at the expense of any other concern.
See also: compass, moral

claim the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: claim, ground, high, moral

take the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to take the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, take

seize the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to seize the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, seize

the moral high ground

A position of moral authority or superiority that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are claimed or purported to occupy, especially in comparison to a differing viewpoint. (Used especially in the phrase "take/claim/seize/etc. the moral high ground.") The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral

moral low ground

A position of moral impropriety that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are claimed or purported to occupy, especially in comparison to a differing viewpoint. The opposite of the more common phrase "moral high ground." That is a repugnant view of this case—I can't believe you're taking the moral low ground here!
See also: ground, low, moral

moral support

Emotional or psychological support that one provides in order to give someone a feeling of confidence, encouragement, approval, or security. My dad's coming with me for moral support while I go make my complaint to the commissioner. After a breakup, it's important to surround yourself with friends and family who can give you moral support while you're feeling down.
See also: moral, support

on moral grounds

Due to reasons stemming from or relating to one's own personal moral or ethical principles. I wish you all the best, but on moral grounds I cannot be associated with your campaign any longer. The religious group has made a formal complaint to the broadcast regulator on moral grounds, claiming that the program in question promotes violence against members of their faith.
See also: ground, moral, on

on moral grounds

considering reasons of morality. He complained about the television program on moral gounds. There was too much ridicule of his religion.
See also: ground, moral, on

moral support

Emotional or psychological backing, as opposed to material help. For example, There's not much I can do at the doctor's office, but I'll come with you to give you moral support . [Late 1800s]
See also: moral, support

the moral high ground

COMMON If a person or organization has the moral high ground, their policies or actions are morally better than the policies or actions of their opponents. No single political party can claim the moral high ground for honesty or religious authority. When it comes to invasion of privacy, none of the newspapers can take the moral high ground. All are guilty. Compare with the high ground.
See also: ground, high, moral

(give somebody) ˌmoral supˈport

(give somebody) your friendship, encouragement, approval, etc. rather than financial or practical help: Will you stay and give me some moral support while I explain to him why I’m late?Your moral support alone isn’t enough. We need money to fund this cause.
See also: moral, support

take, claim, seize, etc. the moral ˈhigh ground

claim that your side of an argument is morally better than your opponents’ side; argue in a way that makes your side seem morally better: Don’t you try to take the moral high ground with me! You’re just as bad as I am!
See also: ground, high, moral

zipper morals

n. loose morals that lead to the easy unzipping of clothing. Ah, youth and its zipper morals!
See also: moral, zipper

moral fiber

Ethical courage. The term dates from the second half of the 1800s. It was applied to World War II pilots who snapped under the strain of combat and refused to fly, and were then accused of lack of moral fiber. Playwright Terrence Rattigan used it in Flare Path (1942): “And on my confidential report they’d put—grounded. Lack of moral fibre” (2:2).
See also: moral
References in periodicals archive ?
The sense of group solidarity created a "moral atmosphere" allowing the peer group to function as a moral authority for its members' behavior (Snarey & Samuelson, 2008).
While there are many ways to teach for moral identity formation, there are a few principles that stand out.
To examine moral decision-making, the researchers designed a modified trust game called the Hidden Multiplier Trust Game.
According to social cognitive theory, moral identity is a complex structure related to moral values, goals, traits, and behavioural scripts (Aquino & Reed, 2002; Lapsley & Narvaez, 2004).
Many researchers reported that parents, teachers, peers and school atmosphere play an important role in the moral development of adolescents.
Moral skeptics are likely to agree that we will respond to such scenarios with utter revulsion, but that making the situations so immediate and emotionally charged will likely bias our theoretical responses.
Among these, we can mention the following: Greed, materialism (manifested in a "get rich quick" mentality on in the penchant for an opulent lifestyle), a distorted sense of "right" and "wrong," a lack of moral principles and values, and moral-ethical insensitivity.
For most of us, the continuum of our moral circle is pretty straightforward: we include our loved ones, and we aren't all that concerned about rocks or the villains of society.
Nurses and organizations both have roles in dealing with moral distress.
Since Gallup first asked in 2002 whether the nation's moral values were getting better or getting worse, the percentage saying worse has always been well above the majority level, ranging from a low of 64% in November 2004 to a high of 82% in May 2007.
This example is much more complex, because it not only refers to a more subtle and nuanced moral perception, but because it also raises the question about the value of moral perception that Murdoch is trying to defend.
Moral emotions have the same structure except that the evaluative component involves not a prudential "should" but a moral "should." When I act on compassion for the suffering of someone, I believe that someone is suffering and that the morally right thing to do, what I morally should do, is to help that person.
Only intuitionists seem to recognize that it is the intuitive principles that carry the greatest moral epistemic weight.
Moral development research pioneered by psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg in the mid-20th century shows that people progress through different stages of moral reasoning as their cognitive abilities mature.