moot

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be a moot point

To be a topic that can no longer be questioned or debated. Whether or not he's the best person for the job is a moot point now that he's tenured.
See also: moot, point

be a moot question

To be a topic that can no longer be questioned or debated. Whether or not he's the best person for the job is a moot question now that he's tenured.
See also: moot, question

moot point

A point, aspect, or topic that is no longer relevant or can no longer be questioned or debated. Whether or not he's the best person for the job is a moot point now that he's tenured. A: "Have you looked at Harvard's program?" B: "That's a bit of a moot point, don't you think? I've already accepted a place at NYU."
See also: moot, point

moot question

A point, aspect, or topic that is no longer relevant or can no longer be questioned or debated. Whether or not he's the best person for the job is a moot question now that he's tenured. A: "Have you looked at Harvard's program?" B: "That's a bit of a moot question, don't you think? I've already accepted a place at NYU."
See also: moot, question

moot point

A debatable question, an issue open to argument; also, an irrelevant question, a matter of no importance. For example, Whether Shakespeare actually wrote the poem remains a moot point among critics, or It's a moot point whether the chicken or the egg came first. This term originated in British law where it described a point for discussion in a moot, or assembly, of law students. By the early 1700s it was being used more loosely in the present sense.
See also: moot, point

be a moot ˈpoint/ˈquestion

be a subject that people disagree on or are uncertain about: It’s a moot point whether women or men make better drivers.A moot was a group of people who met to discuss questions of local or national law during the Anglo-Saxon period. A moot point was a question of law discussed at this meeting.
See also: moot, point, question

moot point, a

A debatable question. This term was originally exclusively a legal one, a moot case or moot point being a case for discussion in a moot, or meeting, of law students. By the eighteenth century, however, it was being used figuratively in a far more general way. For example, “It is a very moot point to which of those causes we may ascribe the universal dulness of the Irish,” wrote Sir C. Wogan (1732–33), cited by the OED.
See also: moot
References in periodicals archive ?
2013) (applying mootness exception where the upper age limit for special education services would be reached in two years).
to have moved towards mootness settlements rather than mootness awards.
mootness, because "plaintiffs have a duty under the Constitution to
(70) Furthermore, Judge Moore's dissent challenges the applicability of equitable mootness for all types of bankruptcy cases, stemming from broader objections to prudential decisions to exercise expressly conferred jurisdiction.
(10) In the 1980s and 1990s, the court emphasized the constitutional nature of its justiciability doctrine and borrowed freely from federal case law concerning standing, mootness, ripeness, and advisory opinions.
Durante a presidencia Warren (1953-1969), por exemplo, a Suprema Corte, com muita auto-confianca, rompeu com certas pre-concepcoes e avancou alem das nocoes ate entao estabelecidas em termos de political questions, standing e mootness (FALLON: 1992, p.
1363, 1384 (1973) (characterizing mootness as "the doctrine of standing set in a time frame: The requisite personal interest that must exist at the commencement of the litigation (standing) must continue throughout its existence (mootness)").
Because the Court in MedImmune (and its predecessors) implicitly refers to the underlying doctrines of justiciability--standing (between adverse legal interests of sufficient reality), ripeness (sufficient immediacy) and mootness (substantial controversy)--the Federal Circuit has found it helpful to use these doctrines to answer Article III's basic question: whether the right party raises the right interest at the right time.
because there was no mootness question before the district court, so we are not reviewing that.
The 7th, 9th and 11th Circuits have allowed this tactic in FLSA cases, but the 3rd, 5th and 10th Circuits have rejected the strategy, finding that a plaintiff may move to certify a class even after being offered complete relief on his individual claims in order to avoid mootness.
Bellotti the rights of the listener limiting the stock of information mental exploration a megaphone today, I will address the mootness question what will happen in the future I certainly hope so your honor, they owe me some money the corporation can not have opinions that is unanimous money is speech and speech is protected it cannot squelch the right of the public to hear
outcomes exist: the government's refusal to prosecute, mootness, a
Cases could be filed too soon, raising questions of ripeness, or too late, raising questions of mootness.
(213.) This skepticism also motivates the mootness doctrine.