moonlight

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moonlight flit

A hasty nighttime departure, typically done to avoid paying money that one owes. Primarily heard in UK. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to make a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

be (not) all moonlight and roses

To be very enjoyable and pleasant, especially of a romantic situation. This phrase is often used in the negative to emphasize difficulties in a romantic relationship. I thought that dating an actress would be all moonlight and roses, but she travels so much that I hardly ever see her. Living with a boyfriend or girlfriend is not all moonlight and roses, you know.
See also: all, and, moonlight, rose

do a moonlight flit

To depart hastily at night, typically to avoid paying money that one owes. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to do a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight and roses

A pleasant, sentimental, and romantic situation or atmosphere. Often used in negative constructions to emphasize difficulties in a romantic relationship. I thought that dating an actress would be all moonlight and roses, but she travels so much that I hardly ever see her. Living with a boyfriend or girlfriend is not all moonlight and roses, you know.
See also: and, moonlight, rose

moonlight requisition

A stealthy, inconspicuous theft committed in the middle of the night. I'm planning a midnight requisition to recover the documents from his vault that I'll need to prove my right to the inheritance. It looks like someone made a midnight requisition of my bike. I knew I shouldn't have left it out here overnight.

do a moonlight flit

make a hurried, usually nocturnal, removal or change of abode, especially in order to avoid paying your rent. informal
Make a moonlight flitting is recorded from the early 19th century and appears to have originated in northern England or Scotland. The expression is now often shortened to do a moonlight .
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight and roses

used to characterize an atmosphere of romantic sentimentality.
The expression comes from the title of a song ( 1925 ) by Neil Moret and Ben Black .
See also: and, moonlight, rose

do a moonlight ˈflit

(British English, informal) leave the place where you have been living in quickly and secretly, usually to avoid paying your debts, rent, etc: When I called to get the money she owed me, I found she’d done a moonlight flit.
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight

1. n. illicit liquor; moonshine. Where’s that bottle of moonlight you used to keep under the counter?
2. in. to traffic in illicit liquor. (Best done under the cover of darkness.) He moonlighted during prohibition.
3. in. to work at a second job. Larry had to moonlight to earn enough to feed his family.

moonlight requisition

n. a nighttime theft. (see also liberate.) It took a moonlight requisition to get the medicine we needed.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to this study, moonlighting is positively related to the total income of household.
Their research depicts moonlighting as a result of "financial gluttony", but this is not the only reason that motivates people to seek second job in addition to the first permanent job.
Hendricks, vice president, Interactive media at McClatchy, was recently appointed to Moonlighting's board of directors.
While the unemployment rate has close to doubled during the recent economic downturn, the overall incidence of moonlighting has changed only about 15 percent from a pre-recession high of 5.78 percent in 2004 to its current low in 2012 of five percent.
The moonlighting is supply of labour in more than one job.
Given the magnitude of moonlighting and the policy implications that its cyclicality may have for the functioning of the labor market, we examine the responsiveness of male and female multiple-job holding to business cycles.
BLUE MOON: Bruce Willis and Cybill Shepherd in the 80s hit TV series Moonlighting
This is followed by an argument for the value of moonlighting in organization studies, a review of the academic literature, and a discussion of possible reasons why multiple jobholding is under-researched.
TV geeks will appreciate another extra: Vintage 1985 ABC promos hyping the premiere of "Moonlighting."
Answer: Employer policies that prohibit moonlighting do raise some issues of privacy, fairness, and even discrimination, but in general, the courts have upheld no-moonlighting rules when they are applied uniformly and supported by some business justification.
IT used to be referred to as moonlighting - working in your spare time to boost a meagre day-job income - now it's called sunlighting.
Readers were asked how concerned they were about job security, whether they were moonlighting, and if they expected economic conditions to improve over the next six months.
MOONLIGHTING MPs who double their salary with jobs outside the Commons face a tough new crackdown.
For additional information on reasons for moonlighting, read "Twenty-first century moonlighters," Issues in Labor Statistics, Summary 02-07.