moonlight

(redirected from moonlighting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

moonlight flit

A hasty nighttime departure, typically done to avoid paying money that one owes. Primarily heard in UK. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to make a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

be (not) all moonlight and roses

To be very enjoyable and pleasant, especially of a romantic situation. This phrase is often used in the negative to emphasize difficulties in a romantic relationship. I thought that dating an actress would be all moonlight and roses, but she travels so much that I hardly ever see her. Living with a boyfriend or girlfriend is not all moonlight and roses, you know.
See also: all, and, moonlight, rose

do a moonlight flit

To depart hastily at night, typically to avoid paying money that one owes. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to do a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight and roses

A pleasant, sentimental, and romantic situation or atmosphere. Often used in negative constructions to emphasize difficulties in a romantic relationship. I thought that dating an actress would be all moonlight and roses, but she travels so much that I hardly ever see her. Living with a boyfriend or girlfriend is not all moonlight and roses, you know.
See also: and, moonlight, rose

do a moonlight flit

make a hurried, usually nocturnal, removal or change of abode, especially in order to avoid paying your rent. informal
Make a moonlight flitting is recorded from the early 19th century and appears to have originated in northern England or Scotland. The expression is now often shortened to do a moonlight .
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight and roses

used to characterize an atmosphere of romantic sentimentality.
The expression comes from the title of a song ( 1925 ) by Neil Moret and Ben Black .
See also: and, moonlight, rose

do a moonlight ˈflit

(British English, informal) leave the place where you have been living in quickly and secretly, usually to avoid paying your debts, rent, etc: When I called to get the money she owed me, I found she’d done a moonlight flit.
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight

1. n. illicit liquor; moonshine. Where’s that bottle of moonlight you used to keep under the counter?
2. in. to traffic in illicit liquor. (Best done under the cover of darkness.) He moonlighted during prohibition.
3. in. to work at a second job. Larry had to moonlight to earn enough to feed his family.

moonlight requisition

n. a nighttime theft. (see also liberate.) It took a moonlight requisition to get the medicine we needed.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are various definitions of teaching moonlighting in education literature.
Their research depicts moonlighting as a result of "financial gluttony", but this is not the only reason that motivates people to seek second job in addition to the first permanent job.
Moonlighting is a mobile, on-demand application that enables people to earn extra money and get tasks done instantly.
While the unemployment rate has close to doubled during the recent economic downturn, the overall incidence of moonlighting has changed only about 15 percent from a pre-recession high of 5.
Given the magnitude of moonlighting and the policy implications that its cyclicality may have for the functioning of the labor market, we examine the responsiveness of male and female multiple-job holding to business cycles.
BLUE MOON: Bruce Willis and Cybill Shepherd in the 80s hit TV series Moonlighting
A moonlighting rate of 5-6% is a significant portion of the workforce, however there is reason to believe that this is a gross underestimate.
It also should be noted that at most moonlighting sites, the resident is not without a backup physician who can be called with questions, problems, or for assistance.
Although research efforts subsequent to the earliest works have clarified some of the empirical details underlying the moonlighting decision, two elements are nonetheless striking in their absence from moonlighting literature.
Some start their moonlighting activity as a hobby and later realize they can turn a pastime into lucrative, supplemental income.
Many residents, however, may fail to appreciate problems moonlighting may pose with respect to liability insurance.
Moonlighting among women has actually been rising steadily since 1970, paralleling their continued increase in overall labor force participation.
Barber has dealt with the issue of moonlighting in detail over the years and again recently in his
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 8, 2015-US Media Firm McClatchy to Invest in Task-Based Hiring Platform Moonlighting