moonlight

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be (not) all moonlight and roses

To be very enjoyable and pleasant, especially of a romantic situation. This phrase is often used in the negative to emphasize difficulties in a romantic relationship. I thought that dating an actress would be all moonlight and roses, but she travels so much that I hardly ever see her. Living with a boyfriend or girlfriend is not all moonlight and roses, you know.
See also: all, and, moonlight, rose

do a moonlight flit

To depart hastily at night, typically to avoid paying money that one owes. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to do a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

eggs in moonlight

Something that is nonsensical or outrageous. Don't worry about that cockamamie idea of his—it's just eggs in moonshine.
See also: egg, moonlight

moonlight and roses

A pleasant, sentimental, and romantic situation or atmosphere. Often used in negative constructions to emphasize difficulties in a romantic relationship. I thought that dating an actress would be all moonlight and roses, but she travels so much that I hardly ever see her. Living with a boyfriend or girlfriend is not all moonlight and roses, you know.
See also: and, moonlight, rose

moonlight flit

A hasty nighttime departure, typically done to avoid paying money that one owes. Primarily heard in UK. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to make a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight requisition

A stealthy, inconspicuous theft committed in the middle of the night. I'm planning a midnight requisition to recover the documents from his vault that I'll need to prove my right to the inheritance. It looks like someone made a midnight requisition of my bike. I knew I shouldn't have left it out here overnight.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

do a moonlight flit

make a hurried, usually nocturnal, removal or change of abode, especially in order to avoid paying your rent. informal
Make a moonlight flitting is recorded from the early 19th century and appears to have originated in northern England or Scotland. The expression is now often shortened to do a moonlight .
See also: flit, moonlight

moonlight and roses

used to characterize an atmosphere of romantic sentimentality.
The expression comes from the title of a song ( 1925 ) by Neil Moret and Ben Black .
See also: and, moonlight, rose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

do a moonlight ˈflit

(British English, informal) leave the place where you have been living in quickly and secretly, usually to avoid paying your debts, rent, etc: When I called to get the money she owed me, I found she’d done a moonlight flit.
See also: flit, moonlight
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

moonlight

1. n. illicit liquor; moonshine. Where’s that bottle of moonlight you used to keep under the counter?
2. in. to traffic in illicit liquor. (Best done under the cover of darkness.) He moonlighted during prohibition.
3. in. to work at a second job. Larry had to moonlight to earn enough to feed his family.

moonlight requisition

n. a nighttime theft. (see also liberate.) It took a moonlight requisition to get the medicine we needed.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We also include a variety of primary-job characteristics possibly affecting the moonlighting decision and the hours moonlighted, such as the real primary-job hourly wage, tenure, occupation, and whether the job is in the private or public sector.
A $10 increase in women's primary-job wages would reduce their moonlighting likelihood by 1 percentage point and hours moonlighted by approximately 0.2 h.
Additionally, their hours moonlighted dropped to just two more hours per week.
However, the same increase in the growth rate of nonfarm employment would increase the likelihood of moonlighting and the weekly hours moonlighted by women by approximately 3 percentage points and 58 min, respectively, during the reference time period of 2000-2002.
On average, constrained sample members moonlighted at a rate just over 12 percent compared to an average rate of 15 percent for the sample as a whole.
Their negativity implies that, in the period studied, unconstrained workers (the reference category) were more likely to have moonlighted than constrained .workers.
For women who moonlighted, total weekly earnings from all jobs ($241) were equal to little more than half of the earnings of multiple-jobholding men ($450).