month of Sundays


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a month of Sundays

An extremely long, often indefinite period of time. Often used in negative constructions, especially to mean "never." A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Not in a month of Sundays!" We'll be here for a month of Sundays trying to sort through all this paperwork!
See also: month, of, Sundays

month of Sundays

Informal
An indefinitely long period of time: It will take you a month of Sundays to chop all that wood.
See also: month, of, Sundays

month of Sundays, a

A very long time. It is doubtful that this expression, which dates from the early nineteenth century, was ever meant literally—that is, a period of thirty Sundays (or weeks). It first appeared in print in Frederick Marryat’s Newton Forster (1832) and was surely a cliché by the time Ogden Nash played on it in “My Dear, How Did You Ever Think up This Delicious Salad?” (1935): “The salad course nowadays seems to be a month of sundaes.” The British version, a week of Sundays, is never heard in America.
See also: month, of
References in periodicals archive ?
The fictional medical soapie in A Month of Sundays thankfully isn't wrung completely dry for jokes, as it easily could have been.
Terry Doyle and Bill Heslop (front) and Anne Collins, Rob Battisson and Kate Ockenden in A Month of Sundays at Wyken Co-operative Theatre.
A Month of Sundays is the equivalent of being invited around for an evening to the home of two people you barely know to view their holiday snaps.
Entries to the Month of Sundays competition will be open from Thursday 1st April to Wednesday 7th April.
Never in a month of Sundays was Frank Lampard's challenge on Xabi Alonso a red card and it will have irked people more that he seemed to smile as he brandished it.
Of the decision to give the Chelsea free-kick which led to Ballack's late goal, O'Neill said: "I just thought that the referee might give the free-kick, but it was never a free-kick in a month of Sundays."
AWARD-WINNING comedy play A Month of Sundays comes from the pen of The Good Life and Ever Decreasing Circles creator Bob Larby.
He would never have won the race in a month of Sundays. He was never going on the ground and he didn't act on the track."
Yes, the jokes were older than Bob Monkhouse's and the plot more cliched than a month of Sundays.
The following week our special "Month of Sundays" will bring you a FREE ticket to see Warwickshire in action at Edgbaston.
OK, it used more cliches than a month of Sundays but there were some fine wind-ups which Game For A Laugh would have been proud of.
You are more likely to walk out your house at the end of a month of Sundays, see a blue moon and have a Martian approach you and hand over the winning ticket for the Euromillions lottery than get silence from Charly.