push money

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push money

A sum of money that is paid to an employee as a bonus for encouraging customers to buy additional or more expensive goods or services. The tour company offers its guide push money if they can convince tourists to opt into the expensive river cruise. Without the offer of push money, we had little incentive to get customers to buy anything they didn't ask for directly.
See also: money, push
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

push money

n. extra money paid to a salesperson to sell certain merchandise aggressively. (see also spiff.) The manufacturer supplied a little push money that even the store manager didn’t know about.
See also: money, push
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
She discovers, for example, that Jewish culture has no less than seven hundred different types of socially or religiously distinct types of monies. Earmarking indeed.
Howes describes how "his Majestie in person" appointed a jury of sixteen well-reputed goldsmiths "for tryall of the monies" who "gave up their verdict the same day." By constituting "in person" a group of goldsmiths as jurors, James cleverly reminded them of their proper place as subjects and subordinates to the crown, significantly undermining the powers which they had conventionally enjoyed upon such occasions.
Today, influential persons would like smart cards to replace all other monies. Bankers, in particular, want to eliminate the costly, time-consuming process of sorting billions of checks.
All States use forfeited monies for drug law enforcement; however, each State has its own formula for distributing the money.
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) had taken 25 percent of all monies over $100,000 in the mortgage escrow accounts of 72 properties - including co-ops as well as commercial properties - saying the money, amounting to $2.23 million was not insured.
What's really amazing about them is that they rightfully criticize the current Republican-led federal government for spending us into a huge deficit and emptying out the so-called Social Security Trust Fund (something previous administrations, Republican and Democrat, also did), yet they trustingly place retirement monies in Republican hands.
"The more one saves now, the more the monies will grow through the magic of compounding interest and tax-deferral.