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On the other side, the commodities of usury are, first, that howsoever usury in some respect hindereth merchandizing, yet in some other it advanceth it; for it is certain that the greatest part of trade is driven by young merchants, upon borrowing at interest; so as if the usurer either call in, or keep back, his money, there will ensue, presently, a great stand of trade.
For if you reduce usury to one low rate, it will ease the common borrower, but the merchant will be to seek for money.
You've got the money and the looks, and you're a decent boy.
Do you mean to tell me that with all the money I've got you can't get an hour or two of a girl's time for yourself?
Having got the money, how, in the present state of his trade, was the loan to be paid back?
If it will not save my money, it is good for nothing.
He knew the way of it, particularly his way of it, wine in, wit out, and his money would be gone in no time.
Ay, ay," said uncle Glegg, with admonition which he meant to be kind, "we must look to see the good of all this schooling, as your father's sunk so much money in, now,--
I will advance it to the Denvers as coming from you, and you can repay it to me, or the interest of it, when your money becomes due.
And the owl, Too-Too, who was good at arithmetic, figured it out that there was only money enough left to last another week-- if they each had one meal a day and no more.
As it was not my place of business I felt it to be the proper thing to show the money to the proprietor.
I had saved above #100 more, but I met with a disaster with that, which was this--that a goldsmith in whose hands I had trusted it, broke, so I lost #70 of my money, the man's composition not making above #30 out of his #100.
And many strings of money did he give Dog-Tooth and Sea- Lion and all of them.
The poor fellow thought it was a great deal of money to have, and said to himself, 'Why should I work hard, and live here on bad fare any longer?
That was Dunstan's first thought as he approached it; the second was, that the old fool of a weaver, whose loom he heard rattling already, had a great deal of money hidden somewhere.