money

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Reckoning up his money and his bank book, he found that he had left one thousand eight hundred roubles, and nothing coming in before the New Year.
'I wish you would give them to me,' said the other; 'I am very poor.' Then the man pitied him, and gave him all he had; and the little dwarf said in return, 'As you have such a kind honest heart, I will grant you three wishes--one for every penny; so choose whatever you like.' Then the countryman rejoiced at his good luck, and said, 'I like many things better than money: first, I will have a bow that will bring down everything I shoot at; secondly, a fiddle that will set everyone dancing that hears me play upon it; and thirdly, I should like that everyone should grant what I ask.' The dwarf said he should have his three wishes; so he gave him the bow and fiddle, and went his way.
"'All right,' said Long-Fang, 'then will I, too, be a strong man.' And he got himself corn, and began to make fire-brew and sell it for strings of money. And, when Crooked-Eyes complained, Long-Fang said that he was himself a strong man, and that if Crooked-Eyes made any more noise he would bash his brains out for him.
He gave me a direction in writing, and when he gave it me he read it to me, and said, 'There 'tis, madam, if you dare trust yourself with me.' 'Yes, sir,' said I, 'I believe I may venture to trust you with myself, for you have a wife, you say, and I don't want a husband; besides, I dare trust you with my money, which is all I have in the world, and if that were gone, I may trust myself anywhere.'
AND soon now the Doctor began to make money again; and his sister, Sarah, bought a new dress and was happy.
"But there is one obstacle: I do not think that you would ever induce Harold to take this money."
It was my greatest ambition during the summer to save money enough with which to pay this debt.
That it is against nature for money to beget money; and the like.
"That is not what I mean," said the Highwayman; "you cannot save your money by giving up your life."
The first statement of each man--ever an ancient one in homeward- bound forecastles--was: "No boarding-house sharks in mine." Next, in parentheses, was regret at having spent so much money in Yokohama.
Tulliver's done for 'em," said uncle Pullet, who became unusually suggestive where advances of money were concerned.
The uses of every possession are two, both dependent upon the thing itself, but not in the same manner, the one supposing an inseparable connection with it, the other not; as a shoe, for instance, which may be either worn, or exchanged for something else, both these are the uses of the shoe; for he who exchanges a shoe with some man who wants one, for money or provisions, uses the shoe as a shoe, but not according to the original intention, for shoes were not at first made to be exchanged.
You've got as much money to waste as any of 'em, and yet you stick to what's decent and moderate.
If we have ever known what it is to want money we are perfectly familiar with the subject at starting.
That was Dunstan's first thought as he approached it; the second was, that the old fool of a weaver, whose loom he heard rattling already, had a great deal of money hidden somewhere.