money-grubber


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Related to money-grubber: Religious zeal

money-grubber

Someone who obsessively and aggressively attempts to accumulate, hoard, and protect their money. Tom's always been a bit of a money-grubber—he'd sell his own mother if it meant a bit more profit. These fatcat CEOs are such money-grubbers—they don't give a damn about their customers, so long as their pockets are lined.

money grubber

n. a stingy person. The boss is such a money grubber. He still has his first paper clip.
See also: grubber, money
References in periodicals archive ?
The bar examiners and disciplinary process do that very well, but we have failed to properly deal with the perception by the public that we are all liars, cheats, and money-grubbers.
Liberal capitalism in particular, especially as these critics saw it developing in the United States, produces a society of money-grubbers, in which a hollow materialism displaces other "higher" values.
Lady Amaranth is rich and generous, but the money-grubbers around her have no qualms about evicting poor tenants.
IT'S open day at Home Farm - a chance for the Kings to show they're not just a bunch of cow-killing, barn-burning, money-grubbers intent on ruining the countryside.
Are these money-grubbers really showing The Godfather enough respect?
Z in Detroit doesn't waste time when getting rid of the money-grubbers. "`I need this,' `I need that,' those comments are the telltale signs of the kind of women I'm not attracted to," he says.
Now they're playing internationals on Saturday night and you can't get home because they've closed the railways station and what sort of consideration was given to the England supporters when the money-grubbers timed the match at Lansdowne Road next month to start at 4pm on Sunday.
Burnett's novel and Mervyn Leroy's film Little Caesar [1929,1930], Tony Guarino in Armitage Trail's novel Scarface [1930], Roy Earle in Burnett's novel and Raoul Walsh's film High Sierra [1940, 1941]; plus various "Also-rans, has-beens, and other losers." Part Two, 1945-1970, examines film and fictive images of "Strangers and Outcasts" including ethnic and black protagonists; of "Fatal Men" as "Revenge-seekers," "Money-grubbers and social climbers," and "Psychopaths"; and of "Fatal Women" as "Tramps and tomboys," as "Doubles of the self," and as potent women like Miss Otis, who are "more than a match for the men who try to take [them] on" (136).
But in the public's mind, we're swaggering, arrogant money-grubbers. It's time to put a new face on our profession, to accurately reflect that we are soccer coaches, parents, school board members, and community volunteers who fight for the "little guy" against the Enrons of the world.
In other words, the party money-grubbers are banned from putting these corrupting funds in their front pockets, but they can sew huge, new, FEC-approved back pockets into their organizational trousers and fill them with all the soft money they can grab.
Poor Tammy Bruce laments the fact that liberals are using an epithet like "conservative," with all its associations to religions crackpots, vicious homophobes, and ruthless money-grubbers, to describe her [My Perspective, April 16].
"The racecourses have been badly misrepresented as money-grubbers, but those critical owners and trainers should remember that basic rates of daily prize-money would have increased by nearly 30 per cent in year one, notwithstanding any extra racecourse contributions."
The merchants, in turn, gained a new form of legitimation; their patronage of the arts differentiated them from parvenu money-grubbers even as their ministers justified the existing distribution of wealth and power.
Except for a few insatiable money-grubbers, most employees leave jobs because of specific grievances.
We are, at our core, hypocrites, because we denounced materialism in our youth and then became craven money-grubbers as adults.