moment of truth

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moment of truth

The moment or point at which some critical and decisive event, action, or test will occur. It's the moment of truth—this letter will tell me whether I got into my dream school or not. We've been working on a prototype of this device for months. Now comes the moment of truth, when we test it in a real-world environment. As we've seen, polls can be misleading, so the real moment of truth will come when the votes are tallied.
See also: moment, of, truth
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

moment of truth

Fig. the point at which someone has to face the reality of a situation. The moment of truth is here. Turn over your exam papers and begin. Now for the moment of truth when we find out whether we have got planning permission or not.
See also: moment, of, truth
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

moment of truth

A critical or decisive time, at which one is put to the ultimate test, as in Now that all the bills are in, we've come to the moment of truth-can we afford to live here or not? This expression, a translation of the Spanish el momento de la verdad, signifies the point in a bullfight when the matador makes the kill. It was first used in English in Ernest Hemingway's story Death in the Afternoon (1932).
See also: moment, of, truth
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the moment of truth

COMMON The moment of truth is the time when you learn the true facts of a situation or make an important decision. I got onto the bathroom scales. Now came the moment of truth. That was the moment of truth for me. I either walked through that door then or I never walked through it.
See also: moment, of, truth
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

moment of truth

a crisis; a turning point when a decision has to be made or a crisis faced.
This expression is a translation of the Spanish el momento de la verdad , which refers to the final sword thrust in a bullfight.
See also: moment, of, truth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the ˌmoment of ˈtruth

a time when somebody/something is tested, or when important decisions are made: He asked her if she still loved him. It was a moment of truth.Right, now for the moment of truth. Switch it on and see if it works!
See also: moment, of, truth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

moment of truth, the

The critical instant, at which one is put to the ultimate test. The term is a translation of the Spanish el momento de la verdad, which signifies the time in a bullfight in which the matador is about to kill the bull. It was first described in English by Ernest Hemingway in his story Death in the Afternoon, and subsequently was transferred to other critical outcomes. The final calculation in making out one’s income tax return, for example, could be described as one’s moment of truth.
See also: moment, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

moment of truth

A crucial test. Unless a matador is injured or loses his nerve before the end of a bullfight, the climax comes when he reaches over the horns to plunge his sword behind the animal's neck. The matador is then at his most vulnerable, since the bull need only raise its head to gore the man. This “moment of truth” when a matador reveals whether he has sufficient courage is a literal translation of the Spanish phrase for that point in time. By extension, any situation in which a person is called on to show “the right stuff ” can be called the moment of truth.
See also: moment, of, truth
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
She was plugging into her private experience, as she'd done in Quartet, but she was doing it with the lucid "uncompromising gaze (Angler's phrase) of the deliberate artist".' Moments of Truth has much of this, and it is highly recommended to anyone with a genuine interest in the lives and work of the most influential women writers of fiction in the last century.
"Moments of truth," Richardson explains, "come at a point when a company recognises what success or failure looks like in hard, measurable terms - at the point when it really counts." They also, he adds, create opportunities for organisations to create new, more collaborative ways of conducting business.
These contacts really do qualify as important moments of truth. These are moments when citizens encounter a criminal justice agency as clients asking for help or being obliged to stand still; moments when, as citizens, they contemplate the work of the criminal justice system and decide whether it is performing well or badly; and moments when they are asking to participate in the production of justice either as part of a community-based patrol or as part of a jury.
While the most intense moments of truth between citizens and criminal justice agencies may occur when citizens have discrete transactions with the system that involve their particular interest, the most common moments of truth may be those when citizens hear something about the performance of the system and decide whether it is performing well or poorly.
Moments of truth, which, like those of the last 50 years, offer a hope for peace in the years to come.
Moments of Truth. Cambridge, Mass.: Balinger Publishing Co., 1987.
If you haven't created customer lifecycle maps that identify key moments of truth, start now.
The more moments of truth, the better the customer experience.
To optimize the customers' moments of truth, the best practice is to create "customer journey maps." Here's an example of how ISM is currently working with a B2C customer to create a customer journey map.
Well, here's your nickel back!" So much for "moments of truth" that establish your city as stellar in your citizens' eyes!
So how do you as a leader empower your employees to take ownership of these "moments of truth?" Begin by hiring and retaining quality people.
Understand customer lifecycles and moments of truth--and measure how well you are meeting customer expectations at key moments of truth. Also make sure that you quality monitor the customer experience across all channels, not just live contacts.
You can do it by analyzing the data you have at hand: evaluate customer behavior, analyze customer journeys, understand level of effort, evaluate how you can provide the best experience at key moments of truth. What's important to your customers--speed?