molehill


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make a mountain out of a molehill

To exaggerate or put too much focus on a minor issue and make it seem like a major one. You got one B and you're acting like you're failing the class. You're making a mountain out of a molehill, if you ask me. This is a minor setback. Let's not make a mountain out of a molehill.
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of, out

make a mountain of a molehill

To exaggerate or put too much focus on a minor issue and make it seem like a major one. You got one B and you're acting like you're failing the class. You're making a mountain of a molehill, if you ask me. This is a minor setback. Let's not make a mountain of a molehill.
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of

make a mountain out of a molehill

Cliché to make a major issue out of a minor one; to exaggerate the importance of something. Come on, don't make a mountain out of a molehill. It's not that important. Mary is always making mountains out of molehills.
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of, out

make a mountain out of a molehill

Exaggerate trifling difficulties, as in If you forgot you racket you can borrow one-don't make a mountain out of a molehill. This expression, alluding to the barely raised tunnels created by moles, was first recorded in John Fox's The Book of Martyrs (1570).
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of, out

make a mountain out of a molehill

If someone makes a mountain out of a molehill, they talk or complain about a small, unimportant problem as if it is important and serious. The company's CEO has blamed the media for making a mountain out of a molehill. Don't make a mountain out of a molehill — it's really not a big deal.
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of, out

make a mountain out of a molehill

foolishly or pointlessly exaggerate the importance of something trivial.
The contrast between the size of molehills and that of mountains has been made in this and related expressions since the late 16th century.
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of, out

make a ˌmountain out of a ˈmolehill

(disapproving) make a small or unimportant problem seem much more serious than it really is: It’s not such a big problem! You’re making a mountain out of a molehill!
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of, out

make a mountain out of a molehill

To exaggerate a minor problem.
See also: make, molehill, mountain, of, out

make a mountain out of a molehill, to

To exaggerate trifling problems. This English equivalent of the French faire d’une mouche un éléphant (make an elephant out of a fly) first appeared in 1570, in John Fox’s The Book of Martyrs. The legendary humorist Fred Allen played on it: “A vice-president in an advertising agency is a ‘molehill man’ who has until 5 p.m. to make a molehill into a mountain. An accomplished molehill man will often have his mountain finished before lunch” (Treadmill to Oblivion, 1954).
See also: make, mountain, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
He was busy spreading the soil from molehills with a cane-like stick and he sang the praises of the moles for excavating such splendid soil!
Thea Baker with the shilling coin from 1968, which was found in a molehill at Wallington Hall
(11.) William in died after being thrown from his horse, which stumbled on a molehill. Roger Lovegrove wntes, "The supporters of James 11, who had died in exile the year before, did not mourn him and toasted the mole who made his horse stumble as 'the little gentleman in the black velvet waistcoat.'" See Silent Fields: The Long Decline of a Nation's Wildlife (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), 193.
A mixture of 'choppy' along with fine sieved 'pure molehill' isn't anything new, but has for many anglers taken a back seat given the array of additives available today that can be purchased at some cost.
"Molehill" isn't limited to just the Flash Player for desktops either.
"They are making a mountain out of a molehill. This is not good.
A MOLEHILL may be one of the least favourite sights for gardeners, but the public is now being asked to count them in a bid to find out if the secretive creature is in trouble.
"With the benches and heaters they have I think we are making a mountain out of a molehill. It's different today - we are pretty much spoiled.
This year, following the fallow season of MVRDV (who continue to cultivate what some consider to be their mountain out of a molehill vision) the invitation went to Siza and Souto de Moura, no strangers to the world's architectural community.
Perhaps I'm making a mountain out of a molehill, but it's comments like this that make me wonder just how far feminism has come.
While I tried to be brief and to the point with my explanation, as usual, I made a mountain out of a molehill and began to explain to her the art and science of metalcasting.
Thousands of local residents, who claim that the countryside will suffer and the area will be severely blighted by noise and new roads if the airport is expanded, are to take part in the walk which also includes a short rally with local MPs and campaigners at Molehill Green.
Trade negotiators, in seeking "balance" between pharmaceutical companies and poor people needing treatment, may have overlooked the extent to which the world's richest companies can litigate a molehill into a mountain.
John Bossy, Under the Molehill: An Elizabethan Spy Story.
It began appropriately and conspicuously enough with probably the greatest mountain ever made from a molehill, the "Y2K Scare."