mole


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whack-a-mole

1. Literally, an arcade game in which the player uses a small rubber mallet to hit robotic toy moles that pop up randomly in holes laid out across the surface of the machine. I love coming to this old arcade. I have a lot of fond memories playing Whack-a-Mole and Skee-Ball here as a kid.
2. By extension, a situation in which problems continue to arise faster than one is able to solve or cope with them, resulting in piecemeal, incomplete, or temporary results. These dang pop-up ads are so annoying! It's a game of whack-a-mole every time I go online these days! Every time we think we have the software debugged, more problems show up. We've just been playing whack-a-mole from day one!

blind as a bat/beetle/mole

Totally blind, or, figuratively, unseeing. None of these animals is, by the way, truly blind. The bat flies about in the dark in seemingly erratic paths (see bats in one’s belfry), and the beetle and mole burrow through the ground. Nevertheless, these similes are quite old and have become clichés. The bat analogy dates from the sixteenth century at least (John Harvey); the mole and beetle similes come from Roman times and were cited in translations by Erasmus.
See also: bat, beetle, blind, mole
References in classic literature ?
Now you must set to work at your linen for your dowry, for nothing must be lacking if you are to become the wife of our neighbour, the mole!'
Thumbelina had to spin all day long, and every evening the mole visited her, and told her that when the summer was over the sun would not shine so hot; now it was burning the earth as hard as a stone.
But she was not at all pleased about it, for she did not like the stupid mole. Every morning when the sun was rising, and every evening when it was setting, she would steal out of the house-door, and when the breeze parted the ears of corn so that she could see the blue sky through them, she thought how bright and beautiful it must be outside, and longed to see her dear swallow again.
The mole had come to fetch Thumbelina to live with him deep down under the ground, never to come out into the warm sun again, for that was what he didn't like.
She told him how unwilling she was to marry the ugly mole, as then she had to live underground where the sun never shone, and she could not help bursting into tears.
You can sit on my back, and we will fly far away from the ugly mole and his dark house, over the mountains, to the warm countries where the sun shines more brightly than here, where it is always summer, and there are always beautiful flowers.
he was a different kind of husband to the son of the toad and the mole with the black-velvet coat.
After first passing a cambric handkerchief, with some white powder on it, over the part of her neck on which he designed to operate, he placed two layers of color on the moles with the tip of the brush.
The findings from the study indicated that in women, the lowest genetic effect on mole count was on the back and abdomen (26 per cent), and the highest on the lower limbs (69 per cent).
A mole that looks markedly different from the other moles on your body can also indicate something is wrong.
The mole is a self-hammering spike which will dig as much as five meters below the surface and record the temperature of Mars.
While most moles are benign (non-cancerous), in rare cases they can develop into melanoma and changes to a mole can be an early indication of this.
Tom Mole has taken up the challenge; in resistance to what he calls "punctual historicism"--something like the "box" historicism Rita Felski has criticized--Mole's What the Victorians Made of Romanticism extends the catalogue of recent studies that take seriously the mobility of Romantic writing across generations.
You should check your moles every few months and look out for a change in shape where the contour of the mole becomes irregular.