mist

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Related to mists: midsts

see (the) red mist

To fall into a state of extreme anger, excitement, or competitive arousal, such as might cloud one's judgment or senses. Primarily heard in UK. Their striker isn't the most consistent player on the pitch, but once he sees red mist, you had better get out of his way. I'm not sure what happened. I was at the pub having a pint, and then someone insulted me, and I guess I must have seen red mist because, the next thing I knew, I was being dragged away with bloodied knuckles.
See also: mist, red, see

the red mist descends

To fall into a state of extreme anger, excitement, or competitive arousal, such as might cloud one's judgment or senses. Primarily heard in UK. Their striker isn't the most consistent player on the pitch, but once the red mist descends, you had better get out of his way. I'm not sure what happened. I was at the pub having a pint, and then someone insulted me, and I guess the red mist must have descended, because, the next thing I knew, I was being dragged away with bloodied knuckles.
See also: descend, mist, red

red mist

A state of extreme anger, excitement, or competitive arousal, such as might cloud one's judgment or senses. Primarily heard in UK. Their striker isn't the most consistent player on the pitch, but once he sees the red mist, you had better get out of his way. I'm not sure what happened. I was at the pub having a pint, and then someone insulted me, and I guess the red mist must have descended, because, the next thing I knew, I was being dragged away with bloodied knuckles.
See also: mist, red

Scotch mist

A thick mist and drizzling rain, as is common in some parts of Scotland and England. Primarily heard in UK. I hope you brought your umbrella today, because we'll be walking in a Scotch mist.
See also: mist, scotch

lost in the mists of time

Occurring so far in the past as to be totally forgotten by those in the present. For all that we've learned about these ancient structures, most of their purpose has been lost in the mists of time.
See also: lost, mist, of, time

mist over

 and mist up
[for glass] to fog up; [for glass] to develop a coating of water vapor so that one cannot see. The windshield misted over and we could hardly see out. The glass misted up and we had to wipe it off.
See also: mist

mist over

or mist up
v.
1. To cover something with fine droplets of water or some other misty substance: The sprinkler automatically mists over the plants in the greenhouse every day. The humid air misted the mirrors up.
2. To become covered with fine droplets of water or some other misty substance; fog up: The cold windshield misted over with our moist breath. I turned on the blower because the car windows had misted up.
3. To become full of tears: As they sang the old songs, my eyes misted over. I mist up whenever I think of home.
See also: mist
References in classic literature ?
Nor could the young bride any longer deny that a radiance was breaking through the mist, and changing its dim hue to a dusky red, which continually grew more vivid, as if brilliant particles were interfused with the gloom.
I was troubled; a mist came over my eyes, and I felt a faintness seize me, but I was quickly restored by the cold gale of the mountains.
Keep where you are," the guard called to the voice in the mist, "because, if I should make a mistake, it could never be set right in your lifetime.
He was gobbling mincemeat, meatbone, bread, cheese, and pork pie, all at once: staring distrustfully while he did so at the mist all round us, and often stopping - even stopping his jaws - to listen.
The monotony became unbearable, and as the mist thickened, he felt afraid.
From time to time the coast was visible through the broken mist, but no vessel was in sight.
The figure of the Martian grew smaller as he receded, and presently the mist and the gathering night had swallowed him up.
And before Rostov had time to make out what the black thing was that had suddenly appeared in the fog, there was a flash, followed by a report, and a bullet whizzing high up in the mist with a plaintive sound passed out of hearing.
The grey, hot mist, the whitewashed cabin, the long, ugly potato patch, the weird, pathetic figure of that old man from whose brain the light of life had surely passed for ever.
The time goes on; and no sign of an inhabited dwelling looms through the mist.
It was not very dark: there was a bit of moon somewhere above the light veil of mist that lay along the earth.
It was a cold, bleak morning in the beginning of March, and the mist was drifting in dense rolling clouds through the passes of the Cantabrian mountains.
So I ate the lunch I had brought with me, hoping that it was what I wanted; but it was chilly, made up of sandwiches and pears, and it had to be eaten under a tree at the edge of a field; and it was November, and the mist was thicker than ever and very wet-- the grass was wet with it, the gaunt tree was wet with it, I was wet with it, and the sandwiches were wet with it.
We are all in a mist--I know but I can help you this far--men like the Wilcoxes are deeper in the mist than any.
He forgot the cold east wind which blew in his face, bringing with it little puffs of damp grey mist.