mistake

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Related to mistaking: call on, make of, try out, picking on, holding up, took over

an honest mistake

A mistake made unintentionally or unknowingly and without the intention of causing harm; a mistake that anyone might have made in similar circumstances. It was an honest mistake! How was I to know that you wouldn't want me to send that letter with the rest of the mail?
See also: honest, mistake

by mistake

Accidentally; unintentionally. I am so sorry, sir—I gave you the wrong dish by mistake. Oh, they hung up—they called the wrong number by mistake.
See also: mistake

make no mistake

What I have said or am about to say is absolutely certain; do not think otherwise. Make no mistake, I intend to take this all the way to the Supreme Court if I have to. Make no mistake, this was a carefully orchestrated crime—not some amateur job.
See also: make, mistake

make no mistake about it

What I have said or am about to say is absolutely certain; do not think otherwise. Make no mistake about it, I intend to take this all the way to the Supreme Court if I have to. Make no mistake about it, this was a carefully orchestrated crime—not some amateur job.
See also: make, mistake

by mistake

in error; accidentally. I'm sorry. I came into the wrong room by mistake. I chose the wrong road by mistake. Now we are lost.
See also: mistake

If you don't make mistakes, you don't make anything.

Prov. If you try to do something, you will likely make mistakes.; The only way to make no mistakes is to avoid trying to do anything. (Can be used to console someone who has made a mistake.) Alan: I'm sorry there's no dessert. I tried to make a cake, but I messed it up. Jane: That's OK, dear; if you don't make mistakes, you don't make anything. It's a shame that you ruined the sweater you were making, but if you don't make mistakes, you don't make anything.
See also: anything, if, make

make a mistake

to commit an error; to do something wrong accidentally. I made a mistake and I am really sorry about it.
See also: make, mistake

Make no mistake (about it)!

Inf. Do not be mistaken! You can be certain. Sally: I'm very angry with you! Make no mistake about it! Fred: Whatever it's about, I'm sorry. Clerk: Make no mistake, this is the finest carpet available. Sally: I'd like something a little less fine, I think.
See also: make

mistake (someone) for (someone else)

 and mix (someone) up with (someone else)
to confuse someone with someone else; to think that one person is another person. I'm sorry. I mistook you for John. Tom is always mistaking Bill for me. We don't look a thing alike, though. Try not to mix Bill up with Bob, his twin.
See also: mistake

mistake (something) for (something else)

 and mix (something) up with (something else)
to confuse two things with each other. Please don't mix this idea up with that one. I mistook my book for yours.
See also: mistake

mix someone up with someone else Go to mistake someone for someone

else.
See also: else, mistake, mix, up

mix something up with something else Go to mistake something for something

else.
See also: else, mistake, mix, up

by mistake

Erroneously, as in He took my coat by mistake. [c. 1700]
See also: mistake

make no mistake

Have no doubt, certainly, as in Make no mistake-I'll vote Republican no matter who runs. [Mid-1800s] Also see get someone wrong.
See also: make, mistake

mistake for

Take someone or something for someone or something else, as in I'm sorry, I mistook you for her sister, or Don't mistake that friendly smile for good intentions; he's a tough competitor. [c. 1600]
See also: mistake

and no mistake

without any doubt. informal
1993 Sam McAughtry Touch & Go He was a headcase and no mistake.
See also: and, mistake

make no mistake (about it)

do not be deceived into thinking otherwise. informal
1974 Times Make no mistake. We had a major work of television last night.
See also: make, mistake

there is no mistaking someone or something

it is impossible not to recognize someone or something.
See also: mistake, something, there

and ˈno mistake!

(old-fashioned, especially British English) used to show that you are sure about the truth of what you have just said: The dinner party was a disaster, and no mistake!
See also: and

by miˈstake

accidentally; without intending to: I took your bag instead of mine by mistake.
See also: mistake

in miˈstake for something

thinking that something is something else: Children may eat pills in mistake for sweets.
See also: mistake, something

ˌmake no miˈstake (about something)

(spoken) used to emphasize what you are saying, especially when you want to warn somebody about something: Make no mistake (about it), this is one crisis that won’t just go away.
See also: make, mistake

there’s no miˈstaking somebody/something

somebody/something is easy to recognize; something is obvious: There’s no mistaking her voice — she’s got a very strong Scottish accent.There’s no mistaking the new mood of optimism in the country.

mistake for

v.
To wrongly perceive that someone or something is someone or something else: I'm sorry to have bothered you—I mistook you for a friend of mine. Don't mistake the poison ivy for a box elder vine!
See also: mistake

Make no mistake (about it)!

sent. an expression signifying the sincerity of the speaker’s previous statements. Make no mistake! This is the real thing.
See also: make, mistake

Make no mistake !

verb
See also: make
References in classic literature ?
There's no mistaking that fluffy ash upon your coat.
There was no mistaking the meaning in the eye that met hers.
on the lining, and a white silk muffler: there was no mistaking the fact that these costly articles were the property of Julius Beaufort.
My heart leapt; there was no mistaking the depressions in the case.
But before he had time to form an exact idea of the situation, there was no mistaking the agitation of which he instantly became the object, and this soon enabled him to pluck up courage, although the adventure of Kazah did come back rather vividly to his memory.
There was no mistaking their origin; only a lion could make such a noise as that.
He had never thought her capable of passion, and this was passion: there was no mistaking it.