mist


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see (the) red mist

To fall into a state of extreme anger, excitement, or competitive arousal, such as might cloud one's judgment or senses. Primarily heard in UK. Their striker isn't the most consistent player on the pitch, but once he sees red mist, you had better get out of his way. I'm not sure what happened. I was at the pub having a pint, and then someone insulted me, and I guess I must have seen red mist because, the next thing I knew, I was being dragged away with bloodied knuckles.
See also: mist, red, see

the red mist descends

To fall into a state of extreme anger, excitement, or competitive arousal, such as might cloud one's judgment or senses. Primarily heard in UK. Their striker isn't the most consistent player on the pitch, but once the red mist descends, you had better get out of his way. I'm not sure what happened. I was at the pub having a pint, and then someone insulted me, and I guess the red mist must have descended, because, the next thing I knew, I was being dragged away with bloodied knuckles.
See also: descend, mist, red

red mist

A state of extreme anger, excitement, or competitive arousal, such as might cloud one's judgment or senses. Primarily heard in UK. Their striker isn't the most consistent player on the pitch, but once he sees the red mist, you had better get out of his way. I'm not sure what happened. I was at the pub having a pint, and then someone insulted me, and I guess the red mist must have descended, because, the next thing I knew, I was being dragged away with bloodied knuckles.
See also: mist, red

Scotch mist

A thick mist and drizzling rain, as is common in some parts of Scotland and England. Primarily heard in UK. I hope you brought your umbrella today, because we'll be walking in a Scotch mist.
See also: mist, scotch

lost in the mists of time

Occurring so far in the past as to be totally forgotten by those in the present. For all that we've learned about these ancient structures, most of their purpose has been lost in the mists of time.
See also: lost, mist, of, time

mist over

 and mist up
[for glass] to fog up; [for glass] to develop a coating of water vapor so that one cannot see. The windshield misted over and we could hardly see out. The glass misted up and we had to wipe it off.
See also: mist, over

mist over

or mist up
v.
1. To cover something with fine droplets of water or some other misty substance: The sprinkler automatically mists over the plants in the greenhouse every day. The humid air misted the mirrors up.
2. To become covered with fine droplets of water or some other misty substance; fog up: The cold windshield misted over with our moist breath. I turned on the blower because the car windows had misted up.
3. To become full of tears: As they sang the old songs, my eyes misted over. I mist up whenever I think of home.
See also: mist, over
References in classic literature ?
The coach lumbered on again, with heavier wreaths of mist closing round it as it began the descent.
Jerry, left alone in the mist and darkness, dismounted meanwhile, not only to ease his spent horse, but to wipe the mud from his face, and shake the wet out of his hat-brim, which might be capable of holding about half a gallon.
I indicated in what direction the mist had shrouded the other man, and he looked up at it for an instant.
There was in the room the same thin white mist that I had before noticed.
But soon they were to be hidden from her eye Densely and dark the mists began to gather below, casting black spots of shadow on the vast landscape, and sailing heavily to one centre, as if the loftiest mountain peak had summoned a council of its kindred clouds.
He was hidden from sight now by the gathering twilight and the rolling mists.
In this position we wait events, while the dripping mist hangs thicker than ever all round us.
The whole Company, leading their horses, passed across to the small hill which loomed in front of them out of the mist.
The mist hid me, and the carriage, no doubt full of cousins, drove on in the direction of the house; but what an absurd position I was in
We are all in a mist--I know but I can help you this far--men like the Wilcoxes are deeper in the mist than any.
He forgot the cold east wind which blew in his face, bringing with it little puffs of damp grey mist.
I remember, and I know that blue haze like the mist on the mountains in Switzerland.
A mist covered both that and the surrounding mountains.
The day had come, and a heavy mist had descended upon the land: the mist penetrating, enveloping, and silent; the morning mist of tropical lands; the mist that clings and kills; the mist white and deadly, immaculate and poisonous.
Little James never forgot these things, and long afterwards, when he grew to be a man and wrote poetry, it was full of the sounds of battle, full, too, of love for mountain and glen and their rolling mists.