misgender

misgender

To refer to someone with a name, pronoun, or title that does not align with their gender identity. She is a trans woman, so please don't misgender her by calling her "sir."
References in periodicals archive ?
'With all due respect, Tito Ricky but I don't think I can allow anyone to misgender me or even call me by my former name.
New words include 'blud', slang for friend, gender equality terms such as 'cisgender', 'agender' and 'misgender', and feminist expressions such as 'mansplaining' and 'manspreading'.
Ms Farrow argued that she had done nothing wrong and the mistake was "inadvertent and Freudian" because she tries "really hard not to misgender people".
She argued that she had done nothing wrong and the mistake was "inadvertent and Freudian" as she tries "really hard not to misgender people".
Sofocleous also tells the Cyprus Mail that last October he was warned by a Durham University lecturer that he faced possible expulsion should he 'misgender' anyone on campus.
Unfortunately, some NPs appeared to inadvertently misgender patients due to lack of adequate understanding of transgender identity.
(31) In a separate incident, Rivera Schatz proceeded to misgender openly-lesbian Junta de Control Fiscal (Financial Oversight and Management Board) member Ana Matosantos, referring to her twice as "el senor Matosantos" (Mr.
See also About TDOR, supra note 1 (discussing physical anti-trans violence as a manifestation of prejudice); Misgender, ENGLISH OXFORD LIVING DICTIONARY, https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/misgender (last visited Dec.
In New York City, you can be fined up to $250,000 if you intentionally "misgender" someone by using the wrong pronoun, even if the person requests you use politically charged pronouns such as "ze" and "hir".
Additionally, research might examine whether activating mating motives makes people more likely to misgender transgender individuals.
They knew that she was transgender, and they proceeded to misgender her.
(2) Many studies have found that news media consistently misname and misgender transgender individuals (e.g., Barker-Plummer, 2013; Squires & Brouwer, 2002), misrepresent transgender identity (e.g., MacKenzie & Marcel, 2009; Schilt & Westbrook, 2009), portray transgender individuals as "tricksters" who live out their gender to seduce heterosexuals (e.g., Sloop, 2000; Squires & Brouwer, 2002), and sexualize the transgender body (e.g., MacKenzie & Marcel, 2009; Sloop, 2000).
It would mean there would not be anything left in my identification documents to misgender me--to lie about who I am."
When referring to the victims in these cases, we use first names in an attempt to reinforce their preferred names and pronouns (when known) and to resist the media's tendency to use nonpreferred names and misgender victims.