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do it with mirrors

1. To do or perform something (especially a magic trick) by using an optical illusion. Everyone was astounded when he appeared to levitate off the ground, but I'm pretty sure he just did it with mirrors.
2. To do something in a highly secretive, illusory, or inexplicable way, likened to that of a magic trick. The military operation was completely unseen, completely unnoticed by anybody, as if they did it with mirrors. The company's CEO managed to swindle his clients out of millions of dollars, doing it with mirrors so that no one would notice the disappearance of the money until it was too late.
See also: mirror

able to fog a mirror

Alive, perhaps barely. (If one holds up a mirror to one's nose or mouth, the breath will cause fog to appear.) I spent the whole day moving furniture, so I'm barely able to fog a mirror now. He'll date any woman who's able to fog a mirror.
See also: able, fog, mirror

smoke and mirrors

Trickery, deception, or misdirection. The candidate has been accused of using smoke and mirrors during the debate to undermine the credibility of his opponent. Before computer generated effects, filmmakers had to use a lot of smoke and mirrors to make fantastic, unbelievable things look realistic in their movies.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

(all) done with mirrors

Done using trickery, deception, or misdirection. Before computer generated effects, fantastic, unbelievable things in movies were all done with mirrors.
See also: done, mirror

(all) done by mirrors

Done using trickery, deception, or misdirection. Before computer generated effects, fantastic, unbelievable things in movies were all done by mirrors.
See also: by, done, mirror

able to fog a mirror

Fig. Inf. alive, even if just barely. (Usually jocular. Alludes to the use of a small mirror placed under the nose to tell if a person is breathing or not. (Able to can be replaced with can.) Look, I don't need an athlete to do this job! Anybody able to fog a mirror will do fine!
See also: able, fog, mirror

smoke and mirrors

deception and confusion. (Said of statements or more complicated rhetoric used to mislead people rather than inform. Alludes to the way a magician uses optical illusion to create believability while performing a trick. Fixed order.) Most people know that the politician was just using smoke and mirrors to make things look better than they really were. Her report was little more than smoke and mirrors. No one will believe any of it.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

smoke and mirrors

Smoke and mirrors are words and actions that are intended to deceive or confuse people, especially by making something seem better than it really is. The president claims that his economic plan is free of the smoke and mirrors of previous presidential budget proposals. Thousands of shareholders learned too late that the company's image of success had been created with smoke and mirrors. Note: Magicians sometimes use smoke and mirrors when they are performing tricks, in order to confuse or deceive people.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

all done with mirrors

achieved with an element of trickery.
This phrase alludes to the fact that conjuring tricks are often explained as being achieved through the skilful use of mirrors; compare with smoke and mirrors (at smoke).
See also: all, done, mirror

smoke and mirrors

the obscuring or embellishing of the truth of a situation with misleading or irrelevant information. chiefly North American
1998 Sunday Telegraph Ministers accused the Conservatives of a ‘smoke and mirrors’ con trick.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

smoke and ˈmirrors

used to describe ways of tricking people or of hiding the truth: He said the government had used smoke and mirrors to raise taxes.The commission has declared war on the smoke and mirrors of sales promotions.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

done by mirrors

and done with mirrors
mod. illusory; accomplished in a way that is purposefully deceptive. He’s not really smart. It’s all done by mirrors. The whole budgetary process is done with mirrors.
See also: by, done, mirror

done with mirrors

verb
See also: done, mirror

smoke and mirrors

n. a strategy of deception and cover up. Her entire report was nothing but smoke and mirrors. Who could believe any of it?
See also: and, mirror, smoke

smoke and mirrors

Something that deceives or distorts the truth: Your explanation is nothing but smoke and mirrors.
See also: and, mirror, smoke
References in periodicals archive ?
In this issue Nochlin considers the Jewish Museum's controversial exhibition "Mirroring Evil: Nazi Imagery/Recent Art." PHOTO: E.E.
In a synchronous mirroring approach, all data (whether corrupt or not) is immediately replicated to the secondary storage device.
One method to address the two data integrity issues discussed above is to use "snapshot-enhanced" mirroring. This technology combines platform-independent, any-to-any, asynchronous mirroring with low-capacity, instant point-in-time snapshots to ensure data integrity between sites while enabling rapid recovery after a disaster.
One of the biggest benefits of using snapshot-enhanced mirroring is the ability to utilize the same snapshots for other purposes as well.
We can expand a simple remote synchronous mirroring installation into a complete storage disaster recovery configuration.
This mirror of Site 1 data has been kept synchronized up until the time of the disaster with Site 1 data by the iSCSI switch at Site 1 performing synchronous mirroring over the dark fiber DWDM connection.
As mentioned in the previous section, when used in conjunction with iSCSI switch mirroring and FC or third party FC tunneling techniques, it can provide an off-site disaster recovery facility which re-connects hosts with mirrored partners within seconds of primary site failure.
Or, mirroring two RAID-5 arrays together allows one mirror to take all IO activity while the other undergoes parity rebuild.
The total usable capacity generated from a given raw capacity, which is total raw capacity minus capacity generated for redundancy (again, mirroring for RAID-1 and RAID-1+0, which is seven drives for a 14-drive array; parity for RAID-5, which is one drive for a 14-drive array).
Unlike HP, IBM offers FlashCopy (IBM's version of a snapshot) and Remote Mirroring with the FAStT700 through the Storage Manager software.
The CX600 has SnapView, as well as MirrorView Remote Mirroring capabilities, which means either snapshots or mirrors may be used remotely.
Remote mirroring replicates data from online production servers to back-up servers at remote sites that can take over if a disaster strikes the primary site.
Remote mirroring was initially implemented in host-based software systems.
By far, the most common use of disk-based mirroring is online simultaneous point in time backups (Fig 2).
Really intelligent disk-based mirroring schemes use techniques to trace changes that have occurred causing the original and the mirror to differ.