mine for

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mine for

1. To extract a specific material, such as ore or minerals, through digging and boring. They used to mine for silver on this part of the mountain. We've been mining for coal in this region for centuries—if that ends now, our entire community will be destroyed.
2. To dig and bore into a particular thing or location in order to extract a specific material, such as ore or minerals. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mine" and "for." They've been mining these hills for diamonds for so long that the whole area is stripped bare. We're going to mine this section of the mountain for a rare metal used in electronics.
3. To obtain a lot of very detailed information from someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mine" and "for." This book has been a great resource to mine for facts about the Civil War. My neighbor used to be an astronaut, so I've been mining him for information to use in my science project about the solar system.
See also: mine

mine for something

to dig into the ground in search of a mineral, a metal, or an ore. The prospectors ended up mining for coal. What are they mining for in those hills?
See also: mine
References in periodicals archive ?
"The current plan is to be mining for the next 10 years with that pit."
For example, because agencies can use data mining for such purposes as to more quickly and effectively identify relationships and similarities between crimes and to forecast future events based on historical behavioral patterns, they can develop investigative leads and effective action plans more rapidly.
According to the April 2002 draft report Mining for the Future, compiled by the International Institute for Environment and Development, the number of abandoned mines in Canada is estimated at about 10,000, and South Africa has 134 abandoned asbestos mines and 400 asbestos mine dumps that supply a steady flow of asbestos dust to the region.
Environmentalists fear that mining for minerals there will leave toxic waste materials behind and harm wildlife.
continues exploration efforts to identify significant deposits that could see it through for at least two or three more decades to come, says Allen Hayward, vice-president of mining for the company's nickel business unit.
But Holmes emphasizes Falconbridge has no intention of straying from its core business of mining for base metals.
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