mine for

mine for

1. To extract a specific material, such as ore or minerals, through digging and boring. They used to mine for silver on this part of the mountain. We've been mining for coal in this region for centuries—if that ends now, our entire community will be destroyed.
2. To dig and bore into a particular thing or location in order to extract a specific material, such as ore or minerals. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mine" and "for." They've been mining these hills for diamonds for so long that the whole area is stripped bare. We're going to mine this section of the mountain for a rare metal used in electronics.
3. To obtain a lot of very detailed information from someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mine" and "for." This book has been a great resource to mine for facts about the Civil War. My neighbor used to be an astronaut, so I've been mining him for information to use in my science project about the solar system.
See also: mine

mine for something

to dig into the ground in search of a mineral, a metal, or an ore. The prospectors ended up mining for coal. What are they mining for in those hills?
See also: mine
References in periodicals archive ?
Severe fires could shut down the mine for weeks causing serious injuries to workers who have inhaled fumes and smoke.
If successful, Barrick plans to start production in 2009 and operate the open-pit mine for 21 years.
When you mine for gold, you also extract pyrite, or fool's gold, says Bob Ekey of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, a conservation group in Montana.
For every dollar donated, a single bat is assured a safe place to sleep in the mine for the winter.
In this case, two ponds were required because there wasn't enough level land near the mine for a single facility (the wetland's size is determined by the amount of flow from the mine).