mind

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mind

n. [one’s] head. Quiet or I’ll clout your mind!
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References in classic literature ?
The stuff of which the world of our experience is composed is, in my belief, neither mind nor matter, but something more primitive than either.
In the Philebus, probably one of the latest of the Platonic Dialogues, the conception of a personal or semi-personal deity expressed under the figure of mind, the king of all, who is also the cause, is retained.
It is, therefore, entirely his own produc- tion; and, considering how long and dark was the ca- reer he had to run as a slave,--how few have been his opportunities to improve his mind since he broke his iron fetters,--it is, in my judgment, highly creditable to his head and heart.
If I changed my mind, it must be because of something important and entirely new to me."
I can't call to mind that anything happened to alarm Rosanna."
whereas the truth-finder, having raked out that jakes, his own mind, and being there capable of tracing no ray of divinity, nor anything virtuous or good, or lovely, or loving, very fairly, honestly, and logically concludes that no such things exist in the whole creation.
"No dust has settled on one's mind then, and it presents a clear mirror to the rays of things.
Shortly after his departure, such anxieties on Magdalen's account as her mind was now able to feel were relieved by better news than her last night's experience had inclined her to hope for.
"You have no idea how such an apprehension weighs on the sufferer's mind, and how difficult--how almost impossible--it is, for him to force himself to utter a word upon the topic that oppresses him."
In his mind, as in her own, the gulf widened; but faster than it widened, towered his ambition to win across it.
"If you can prove I'm guilty, I'll be willing to die nine times, but a mind's eye is no proof, because the Woggle-Bug has no mind to see with."
We have the same national mind expressed for us again in their literature, in epic and lyric poems, drama, and philosophy; a very complete form.
Things which I didn't mind at all, at first, I began to mind now -- and more and more, too, all the time.
In plain truth, she had simply taken her place in my mind, to the exclusion of every other person and every other subject.
You boast of consciousness, but you are not sure of your ground, for though your mind works, yet your heart is darkened and corrupt, and you cannot have a full, genuine consciousness without a pure heart.