millennial

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Related to millennialism: premillennialism

millennial

An individual of the generation whose members were born between roughly 1980 and 2000. Ever since millennials started moving into our town, every other building is a yoga studio or a coffee shop.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Oxford Handbook of Millennialism (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011); Richard Landes, Heaven on Earth: The Varieties of the Millennial Experience (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011); and Stephen Hunt, ed.
Gribben then traces the return of millennialism to Protestant thinking more broadly.
49) He pledged that he would "keep the faith" of evangelical millennialism as he rose in office.
Morris hadn't a clue about his subject, Reagan's conservative philosophy, or even his motivations, so, in the school of magical realism that is country cousin to modern ideologies like communism, socialism, and modern millennialism of Podhoretz, Kristol, and Lowry, Morns invented a fictional Dutch to carry the storyline to its bittersweet conclusion.
Zhuk's enticing title suggests that in Russia's southern region and Ukraine a reformation similar to the Protestant transformation of early modern Europe took place among certain extreme sects that valued literacy and millennialism.
She further contends that the rise of Christian fundamentalism in America has encouraged Hollywood to turn to themes of "Christian millennialism and apocalyptic eschatology" (11).
Protestant millennialism, evangelicalism and Irish society, 1790-2005.
Indeed, if we are to take Hitchens at his word, his new book was written to combat the resurgence of superstition and religious fanaticism exemplified by the rise of Islamic jihadism--and also to some extent by Christian evangelicalism, Jewish millennialism, and Hindu fundamentalism.
Second, Marr turns to American Protestant Christian millennialism and missionary activity to convert Muslims.
George Shepperson states that British millennialism is potentially rich for comparative study because of the interaction with American millennial movements, as individuals build a movement on both sides of the Atlantic using similar sources.
The Aum Shinrikyo sect in late twentieth-century Japan fused an apocalyptic Buddhism with Egyptian occultism, Christian millennialism, and the prophecies of Nostradamus, the sixteenth-century French astrologer.
From the Puritans' redemptive mission to the Enlightenment's secular New Jerusalem to evangelical millennialism, America and its foreign admirers have constructed a national destiny of dizzying heights.
Emma Major's "The Politics of Sociability: Public Dimensions of the Bluestocking Millennium" further roots Bluestocking identity in the framework of English patriotism by arguing that the Bluestockings' millennialism inextricably tied patriotic duty to Anglicanism.