mighty

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mighty oaks from little acorns grow

Large and powerful things once were very small and insignificant. It's hard to believe that her successful clothing line was once a small business run from her tiny studio apartment. Mighty oaks from little acorns grow.
See also: acorn, grow, little, mighty, oak

great oaks from little acorns grow

Large and powerful things once were very small and insignificant. It's hard to believe that her successful clothing line was once a small business run from her tiny studio apartment. Great oaks from little acorns grow.
See also: acorn, great, grow, little, oak

the pen is mightier than the sword

Strong, eloquent, or well-crafted speech or writing is more influential on a greater number of people than force or violence. Through his hugely popular online campaign, the writer has harnessed the voices of millions of people to have the government stop its violent intervention in the region, proving that the pen truly is mightier than the sword.
See also: mighty, pen, sword

high and mighty

Haughty and scornful. How can you act so high and mighty after all the mistakes you've made?
See also: and, high, mighty

mighty nigh

colloquial, old-fashioned Very close to; almost; nearly. Hey, don't feel bad that you're still single—shoot, I was mighty nigh 40 by the time I met my wife! I heard it's going to be mighty nigh 100 degrees on Saturday. She was mighty nigh frozen to death by the time we fished her out of that lake.
See also: mighty, nigh

a reed before the wind lives on(, while mighty oaks do fall)

Those who remain flexible and adaptable will be able to survive change, hardship, or adversity more easily than those who try to challenge or stand against it. The CEO doesn't tolerate people who won't go along with his ideas or change to meet his demands. A reed before the wind lives on, at least when you're working at this company. Luckily, I had diversified a lot of my revenue streams before the economic crash hit, so I was able to change tack and withstand the blow better than the large companies that had no room to maneuver. A reed before the wind lives on, while mighty oaks to fall.
See also: before, lives, mighty, oak, reed, while, wind

Great oaks from little acorns grow, and Mighty oaks from little acorns grow.

Prov. Immense things can come from small sources. Don't tell lies, not even small ones. Great oaks from little acorns grow.
See also: acorn, and, great, little, mighty, oak

high-and-mighty

Fig. self-important and arrogant. I don't know why William is so high-and-mighty. He's no better than the rest of us. The boss acts high-and-mighty because he can fire us all.

How the mighty have fallen.

Prov. a jovial or mocking way of remarking that someone is doing something that he or she used to consider very demeaning. Jill: Ever since Fred's wife left him, he has had to cook his own meals. Jane: Well! How the mighty have fallen! When Dan lost his money, he had to sell his expensive sports car. Now he drives an ugly old sedan. How the mighty have fallen.
See also: fallen, have, how, mighty

pen is mightier than the sword

Prov. Eloquent writing persuades people better than military force. Believing that the pen is mightier than the sword, the rebels began publishing an underground newspaper. Alan: Why do you want to become a journalist? Bill: The pen is mightier than the sword.
See also: mighty, pen, sword

reed before the wind lives on, while mighty oaks do fall

Prov. An insignificant, flexible person is more likely not to get hurt in a crisis than a prominent or rigid person. Our office has new managers now; I plan to be as inconspicuous as possible while they reorganize everyone. A reed before the wind lives on, while mighty oaks do fall.

high and mighty

Conceited, haughty, as in She was too high and mighty to make her own bed. This expression originally alluded to high-born rulers and was being transferred to the merely arrogant by the mid-1600s.
See also: and, high, mighty

great oaks from little acorns grow

People say great oaks from little acorns grow when they want to say that large and successful things can begin in a small way. It is going to take at least five seasons before the new club can take its rightful place in the third division. Still, great oaks from little acorns grow. Note: Other adjectives can be used instead of great and little. Henry Ford did not start his operations by hiring 330,000 employees and opening hundreds of factories in his first year. Remember, mighty oaks from tiny acorns grow. Note: Acorns are the nuts that grow on oak trees.
See also: acorn, great, grow, little, oak

high and mighty

1 important and influential. 2 thinking or acting as though you are more important than others; arrogant. informal
See also: and, high, mighty

the pen is mightier than the sword

writing is more effective than military power or violence. proverb
See also: mighty, pen, sword

ˌhigh and ˈmighty

(informal) behaving as though you think you are more important than other people: He’s too high and mighty to mix with ordinary people like us!
See also: and, high, mighty

the ˌpen is ˌmightier than the ˈsword

(saying) people who write books, poems, etc. have a greater effect on history and human affairs than soldiers and wars
Mightier means ‘stronger’ or ‘more powerful’.
See also: mighty, pen, sword

high and mighty

Arrogant, conceited. Although originally used to describe either spiritual or temporal rulers, this term soon came to mean individuals who used their position of real or imagined power to act haughtily. Thus, while fifteenth- and sixteenth-century sources might address a ruler as “Right heigh and mighty Prince” (as in Hall’s Chronicle of Edward IV, 1548), a century later Richard Whitlock (Zoötamia, 1654) would write of “their high and mighty word, Experience.” It was a cliché by the time Thackeray wrote, “Some of these bankers are as high and mighty as the oldest families” (The Newcomes, 1855).
See also: and, high, mighty

pen is mightier than the sword, the

Writing is more powerful and effective than fighting. This adage appeared as a proverb in 1571 (“No more sword to be feared than the learned pen”) and then took a slightly different form in Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621): “The pen is worse than the sword.” It has quite naturally appealed to writers ever since. Time magazine (1990) used “The Pen Is Mightier” as a headline for a piece announcing that Poland had a journalist as its new prime minister, Czechoslovakia a playwright as president, and Hungary an English translator as president.
See also: mighty, pen
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, all of Soliman's estates, reputation, and mightiness collapse.
Yet IRGC's Commander Gen Muhammad Ali Ja'fari said: "The grandeur and mightiness of our country's armed forces is a deterrent element against enemies' recent aggressions and threats".
Washington did have a regal air, and once even thought of calling himself, or rather having himself called, "His High Mightiness," etc.
When praising the melon, he says, "even lishou, sweet and delicious, cannot be compared with the rarity and mightiness of [melons from] the eastern country" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) (14) The reference to "the eastern country" evokes Zhao Pingi the former Duke of Dongling in Qin [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], who once planted sweet melons at the eastern gate of Chang'an after the Qin were defeated (Sima 1998: 53.2017).
"The regime of al-Saud should know that our war with them will happen for as long as they maintain their disbelief, oppression, mightiness and belligerence against the religion of the Almighty, and that the heads of this regime and its henchmen are legitimate targets for the mujahideen," SITE quoted the statement as saying.
They pledge allegiance and denounce, and renew the aura of your mightiness. It is the era of the crowds.
In the end, titles such as "His Mightiness" and "His Elective Majesty" or "His Highness the President of the United States of America and Protector of the Rights of the Same" were rejected in favor of the simpler "The President of the United States." However, the Constitution accorded him another title with strong royalist associations--"Commander in Chief"--a title first used by Charles I.
It is the unseen parts of the instrument that earn it a true mightiness designation: workings that stand two stories high, including 2,400 pipes from pencil size to 16 feet tall, all hidden in two chambers behind the walls of the theater.
That means the parties, besides exhibiting their mightiness through arms and ammunition in the rallies and conventions and the bloody feuds stealthily played in the streets, have taken time out to use the power of speech by using social media.
He described an officer, "a great patriot" who spoke "with unfeigned enthusiasm of the mightiness of Russia and with great scorn about the Germans and the English whom he had never seen in his life." (77) Chekhov mocked this pompous nationalist who saw himself as a civilized being among barbarians.
(23) The threat of this appeal may allow a weaker actor to induce a stronger one to remain in a voluntary bargaining position, alleviating any worry that an actor's superior mightiness should make him proverbially right.
It gives more of the appearance of equality among Citizens, and that they like." There was good reason both for Adams's proposal that the president should be addressed as "His Mightiness" and for Jefferson's acerbic remark that "We were educated in royalism; no wonder if some of us retain that idolatry still."
"Typically Iran appeals to passengers who have been to the Middle East before - but usually to more mainstream destinations like Jordan and Egypt." A mountain of mightiness, the 17,000ft high holy volcano of Damavand is the Middle East's highest point and Asia's highest volcano.
It was their love of this beautiful goodness, I like to think, more than fear of the native mightiness of Lincoln, that brought the boys to reason, in that wild, murderous moment, against the pull of their most unruly passions.
Anyway, I dug it out, potted the infant, nurtured it, watched, waited - as you do with oaks - and now have a healthy, strapping youngster with a lovely, knobbly bole, a fine leaf canopy and all the makings of mightiness. After scrutinising the leaves and poring over nature books, son and I are sure it's no hybrid but quercus petraea, the sessile oak and rarer of our two native species.