middlebrow

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middlebrow

mod. middle-class; average or mediocre. (Between highbrow and lowbrow.) She has average middlebrow tastes and drives a midsized Chevrolet.
References in periodicals archive ?
North America, the land of "equal opportunity" and high social mobility, the land without an old hereditary aristocracy (the only minority to whom the three Disraeli "Is" were granted as a birthright and who, consequently, constituted the narrow breeding grounds of the highbrows), was, in a sense, created by the middlebrows.
Consider, for example, how the noble principles of sacrificing oneself for one's country or faith and performing one's social duty with valour might reach the poorly-educated, the low-and middlebrows.
show that he has lost touch with the commoners of his country and is evidence that the highbrows (who "speak in complete sentences") are losing contact and mutual understanding with the middlebrows.
The curse of the middlebrows, their money-dominated frame of reference and their imitative existence devoid of spirituality, can at least be alleviated if we secular humanists pay attention, and if we work hard to preserve and broadcast the real culture as widely and quickly as possible.
This is a classic example of middlebrow vulgarization of the ideas that least deserve it.
John Shapcott's essay 'Arnold Bennett's Evening Standard Columns' offers a more detailed and much needed exploration of the role of Arnold Bennett in constructing the middlebrow but usefully notes the fact that there are several overlaps between middlebrow and other cultural strata that present a 'difficulty with confining both Bennett and the texts he recommended within the often implied pejorative term "middlebrow"' (p.
The focus of Kate MacDonald's The Masculine Middlebrow, 1880-1950: What Mr Miniver Read is narrower-a 'masculine trend' in early twentieth-century British middlebrow writing and reading that remains, according to the author, 'largely unexamined' (p.
MacDonald's introductory chapter explains how, following on from critical explorations of the 'feminine' middlebrow such as Nicola Humble's The Feminine Middlebrow Novel, 1920s to 1950s (Oxford, 2002), the 'aim of the present book is to consider the writing, particularly the non-fiction writing, from the same period, that can be characterised as masculine and that was aimed at the male reader' (p.
The result is a collection which explores how a wide range of literary forms-including anthologies, critical essays of eminent 'Men of Letters' and late nineteenth-century newspapers and periodicals such as Tit-Bits and Alfred Harmsworth's Daily Mail-construct and reflect emerging middlebrow culture in the years from 1880-1950.
Jonathan Wild's chapter on The Boer War's 'significance' in the evolution of middlebrow as both a culture and a literature is particularly illuminating and original, offering a causal examination of the ways in which the War, via the British press, led to 'changes in reading matter and reading habits' that precipitated the rise of the middlebrow (pp.
Eric, you touched a poignant note when you talked about your animus against the middlebrow theatre.
He was a triumphant, witty, powerful middlebrow, and he prevented a lot of very important playwrights and directors from being produced in New York.
Significantly, while Midler's camp persona--melding lowbrow burlesque with postmodern irony--was quite acceptable to intellectual elites, her growing association with a feminized middlebrow culture that takes emotions and relationships seriously (whether on Oprah or in Midler's previous film Beaches) seems more than some critics can bear.
See, for example, Virginia Woolf's 1942 essay "Middlebrow" and Russell Lynes's 1949 "Highbrow, Middlebrow, Lowbrow," discussed in Rubin xiii-xv.
Middlebrow Moderns: Popular American Women Writers of the 1920s.