mete out

(redirected from meting out)

mete out

To distribute or dispense something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "mete" and "out." It is the Supreme Court's job to mete out justice in a situation like this.
See also: out

mete something out

to measure something out. She meted the solution out carefully into a row of test tubes. She meted out the cookies to each of them.
See also: out

mete out

v.
To distribute and apply a measure or judgment of something: The cook meted out small portions of soup to the soldiers. Our school principal metes out strict punishment to those who break the rules. The central office gathers information and metes it out to the departments that need it.
See also: out
References in periodicals archive ?
In Kansas last year the state's second highest court pushed Lawrence aside to uphold a state law meting out different punishments for gay and straight sex.
"What infuriates me is that this is about meting out blame," Marc Blondel, head of the Worker's Force union, claimed on France-Inter radio, as quoted by the Associated Press.
They saw the Black Codes as providing black people with potential protections non-existent before the Civil War, and it was precisely this access to formal law (alongside the 14th and 15th amendments and Republican rule) which threatened the "efficiency" of meting out justice.
In her recent installation Barbara Kruger used the royal "we" to subjugate, threaten, and harass "you." That "we" was given an audible Big Brother voice--male, of course--coolly meting out invective in a brilliantly mixed soundtrack punctuated with cheers, laughter, screams, church music, gagging noises, and an ominous sample from the song "We Are the World." "My people are better than your people," the voice in-toned, "More intelligent, more graceful, more powerful, more beautiful, more chosen, more agile and cleaner.
The House of Representatives has passed a measure meting out the penalty of life imprisonment for the hacking of a bank's systems, which would be considered a form of economic sabotage.
But any secretly gay person who uses his bully pulpit to vilify his own people deserves the treatment gay blogger Michael Rogers is now meting out in the nation's capital.
Senator Panfilo Lacson, who headed the PNP from 1999 to 2001, said the public expects 'more positive action other than a strong reprimand, such as meting out the commensurate punishment for erring police personnel.'