mention


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Related to mention: don't mention it

come to mention it

An expression used when one remembers or realizes something because of what the other person has just said. An abbreviated form of the full phrase "now that you have come to mention it." A: "The weather's been a bit unpredictable lately, huh?" B: "Come to mention it, I hear there could be a blizzard next week." A: "I hate filling out these tax forms." B: "Come to mention it, I don't think I ever filed my taxes last year!"
See also: come, mention

now (that) you mention it

An expression used when one remembers or realizes something because of what the other person has just said. A: "The weather's been a bit unpredictable lately, huh?" B: "Now you mention it, I hear there could be a blizzard next week." A: "I hate filling out these tax forms." B: "Now that you mention it, I don't think I ever filed my taxes last year!"
See also: mention, now

honorable mention

A recognition or citation of merit given to a contestant, exhibition, entry, etc., in a competition despite that person or thing not being awarded a prize or top honor. Primarily heard in US. My short story did not win a top place in the writing competition, but being given an honorable mention still gives me great pride.
See also: mention

don't mention it

It was no big deal. Usually said in response to "thank you." A: "Thanks so much for saving me a seat." B: "Don't mention it!"
See also: mention

mention (something) in passing

To say something, casually or as an aside, during a conversation. It wasn't the main focus of our discussion—he only mentioned it in passing. Karen mentioned the party in passing the other day, but she didn't go into detail.
See also: mention, passing

you're welcome

A response to "thank you" or "thanks" meaning that one was glad to do it and would do it again. A: "Thanks for picking up that package for me." B: "Oh, you're welcome."
See also: welcome

not to mention

In addition to or as well as what's been discussed. Typically used to mention an additional item when listing things that one considers negative. I've already got to spend three hours in the car running errands, not to mention the hour and a half it will take to pick up the kids from school. They have two massive houses in the city, not to mention their vacation home by the beach.
See also: mention, not

be mentioned in dispatches

To be recognized for one's bravery or heroism, as of a member of the military. Primarily heard in UK. You'll be mentioned in dispatches for saving so many men in your platoon.
See also: dispatch, mention

mention (someone or something) in the same breath

To compare two people or things, especially when one is considered to be superior to the other. Please don't mention that traitor in the same breath as George Washington. Gina found it incredibly flattering to be mentioned in the same breath as some of her favorite novelists.
See also: breath, mention, same

make mention of (someone or something)

To briefly mention or allude to someone or something. The guidebook makes mention of the city's troubled past, but it doesn't really elaborate on it at all. Did she at least make mention of me at all during the party?
See also: make, mention, of

mention (someone or something) in (something)

To name, bring up, or refer to someone or something in a particular situation, piece of writing, context, etc. The president made a point of not mentioning his opponent during his speech. You mentioned a new way of coming up with ideas in your book—could you elaborate on that a little bit more? Be sure to mention your extracurricular activities in your application.
See also: mention

mention (someone or something) to (one)

To name, bring up, or refer to someone or something while talking to one. Would you mind mentioning me to your boss? I'm looking for a job as an editor. Be sure to mention the issue to the president when you meet with her later.
See also: mention

not worth mentioning

Not having enough importance to warrant or require comment, explanation, apology, etc. A few other issues cropped up during testing, but they're not worth mentioning. A: "I'm so sorry for screwing your computer!" B: "Don't worry about it, I'll get it fixed up in no time. It's not worth mentioning."
See also: mention, not, worth

Don't mention it.

You are welcome and your thanks are not necessary. A: Thank you so much! B: Don't mention it.
See also: mention

(I) just want(ed) to say something.

 and (I) just want(ed) to mention something.; (I) just want(ed) to tell you something.
a sentence opener that eases into a statement or question. (Can be followed by words like say, ask, tell you, be, and come.) Rachel: I just wanted to say that we all loved your letter. Thank you so much. Andrew: Thanks. Glad you liked it. Rachel: I just wanted to tell you how sorry l am about your sister. Alice: Thanks. I appreciate it. Andrew: Just wanted to come by for a minute and say hello. Tom: Well, hello. Glad you dropped by.
See also: just, say, want

make mention of someone or something

to mention someone or something. Did you have to make mention of Sally? I'm angry with her. I will have to make mention of your failure to secure additional business.
See also: make, mention, of

mention someone or something in passing

to mention someone or something casually; to mention someone or something while talking about someone or something else. He just happened to mention in passing that the mayor had resigned. John mentioned in passing that he was nearly eighty years old.
See also: mention, passing

mention someone or something in something

 
1. to name someone or something in a particular context. We mentioned you in regard to nominations for the congress. Everyone mentioned your book in the discussions.
2. to name someone or something in a will, lecture, story, article, etc. They mentioned your name in the discussion. Uncle Herman mentioned you in his will.
See also: mention

mention something to someone

to refer to something while talking to someone. Please mention it to your father. You had better not mention that to anyone.
See also: mention

not worth mentioning

 
1. not important enough to require a comment. There are others, but they are not worth mentioning. A small number of books hint at the phenomenon, but they aren't worth mentioning.
2. [of an error or wrong] not worth apologizing for. This isn't a problem at all. It's not worth mentioning. No need to apologize to me. No harm done. It's not worth mentioning.
See also: mention, not, worth

don't mention it

see under you're welcome.
See also: mention

not to mention

Also, not to speak of; to say nothing of. In addition to, besides what's already been said. For example, I don't think the voters will want that big program, not to mention the cost, or Dave teaches trumpet and trombone, not to speak of other brass instruments, or Their house is worth at least a million, to say nothing of their other assets.
See also: mention, not

you're welcome

Also, don't mention it. No thanks are needed, I was glad to do it. For example, Thanks for picking me up.-You're welcome, or I appreciate what you did for Mother.-Don't mention it. Both phrases are polite formulas for responding to thanks. The first dates from about 1900; the variant was first recorded in 1841. For synonyms, see forget it; no problem, def. 2. Also see welcome to.
See also: welcome

be mentioned in dispatches

be commended for your actions. British
In official military reports from the front line any soldiers who have been responsible for particular acts of bravery are commended by name.
See also: dispatch, mention

don’t ˈmention it

(spoken) used as a polite reply when a person thanks you: ‘Thanks — that’s very kind!’ ‘Don’t mention it.’
See also: mention

mention somebody/something in the same ˈbreath

compare a person or thing with another much better person or thing: How can you mention the Beatles and the Spice Girls in the same breath?

not to mention something

used to introduce extra information and emphasize what you are saying: He’s got a house in London and a cottage in the country, not to mention the villa in Spain.
See also: mention, not, something

you’re ˈwelcome

(especially American English) used as a polite reply when a person thanks you: ‘Thanks for your help.’ ‘You’re welcome.’
See also: welcome

not to mention

In addition to; as well as.
See also: mention, not
References in periodicals archive ?
It is pertinent to mention here that Indian news media in its reports claimed that Pakistan had been placed on the blacklist.
Prior to that, Ahmad Akram told the court that today was fixed for mention to hear an application for the case to be jointly heard with a case involving Najib's former special officer, Datuk Rizal Mansor, 44, who is facing charges with soliciting and accepting bribes for himself and Rosmah over the same project.
The objection against Mr Bhutta is reportedly based a contradiction in the qualification mentioned by him in 2008 and in his recently submitted nomination papers.
Americans' mentions of immigration as the most important problem facing the nation have almost doubled this month, rising to 15% of all mentions from 8% last month.
"It doesn't mention pressure you carry from work into the home."
One of the satellites on his list for launch this Persian year, Tadbir (Prudence), was not even mentioned in Fazeli's previous launch lists.
For instance, the people of Prophet Moosa, may Allh exalt his mention, excelled at magic, so the miracle of Prophet Moosa, may Allh exalt his mention, was that he threw his staff and it turned to a serpent.
The only mention of the area was "Merseyside" (once).
Besides first-degree connections, users can also mention other LinkedIn members engaged in conversations in the comment sections of posts on the Homepage.
Brother's Pizza, Clinton; honorable mention: Tailgaters Grill and P&S Pizza, both in Clinton.
Unit Level TDA Winner: 78th Avn Bn, Camp Zama, Japan (USARPAC) Runner-up: HHC, 7th JMTC, Grafenwoehr, Germany (USAREUR) Honorable Mention: HHC, 516th Sig Bde, HI (NETCOM)
* "I forgot to mention I've written a new paper on ..."
Seven students from 37 schools across the United States were named winners of the 2008 Design Emphasis Awards, with an additional 12 students recognized for merit and honor able mention. The awards were presented during the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta.
For the fourth consecutive year, CAGNY contributed a one-time stipend of $500 to five students whom the Nominating Committee deemed academically worthy to receive an "honorable mention."