mend


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be on the mend

To be in good health again after a period of injury or illness. Jill is happy to be on the mend after her hospital stay. Yes, I was sick earlier this week, but I'm on the mend now.
See also: mend, on

hell mend (someone)

An exclamation of one's anger or irritation with someone else. I can't believe he stole my idea—hell mend him!
See also: hell, mend

it is never too late to mend

proverb There is always the opportunity to reconcile after a conflict. I know you haven't talked to Carly in years, but it is never too late to mend—why don't you try calling her?
See also: late, mend, never

make do and mend

To maintain one's possessions for as long as possible, repairing rather than replacing them when needed, with the goal of not buying and/or consuming more than is necessary. To "make do" is to use what one has or make the best of a situation, even if it is not ideal. Growing up, my mother had to provide for three of us on her own, so we learned very quickly to make do and mend.
See also: and, make, mend

mend (one's) fences

To rectify a damaged relationship. After Jill heard that her father had become ill, she decided it was time for them to mend their fences before it was too late. The politician tried to mend his fences with his constituents after the scandal, but was not able to regain their trust before the next election.
See also: fence, mend

mend (one's) pace

old-fashioned To begin moving faster, especially to meet the speed of another person. Noticing me behind him, the man mended his pace, and I mended mine, until we both began running through the crowded alleyways.
See also: mend, pace

mend (one's) ways

To start behaving in a different, usually preferable, way. After I got in yet another fight at school, the headmaster told me that I had to mend my ways or else I'd be expelled. No matter how old you are, there is still time to mend your ways.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

Healing or getting well; improving in health. I broke my arm last month, so I've just been at home on the mend since then. A: "How's John doing?" B: "He had a rough week of it with the flu, but he's on the mend now, thank God."
See also: mend, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

It is never too late to mend.

Prov. It is never too late to apologize for something you have done or try to repair something you have done wrong. Sue: I still miss Tony, but it's been a year since our big fight and we haven't spoken to each other since. Mother: Well, it's never too late to mend; why don't you call him up and apologize?
See also: late, mend, never

mend

 (one's) fences
1. Lit. to repair fences as part of one's chores. Tom is mending fences today at the south end of the ranch.
2. Fig. to restore good relations (with someone). I think I had better get home and mend my fences. I had an argument with my daughter this morning. Sally called up her uncle to apologize and try to mend fences.

mend one's ways

Fig. to improve one's behavior. John used to be very wild, but he's mended his ways. You'll have to mend your ways if you go out with Mary. She hates people to be late.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

getting better; becoming healthy again. I cared for my father while he was on the mend. I took a leave of absence from work while I was on the mend.
See also: mend, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mend one's fences

Improve poor relations; placate personal, political, or business contacts. For example, The senator always goes home weekends and spends time mending his fences. This metaphoric expression dates from an 1879 speech by Senator John Sherman in Mansfield, Ohio, to which he said he had returned "to look after my fences." Although he may have meant literally to repair the fences around his farm there, media accounts of the speech took him to mean campaigning among his constituents. In succeeding decades the term was applied to nonpolitical affairs as well.
See also: fence, mend

mend one's ways

Improve one's behavior, as in Threatened with suspension, Jerry promised to mend his ways. This expression, transferring a repair of clothes to one of character, was first recorded in 1868, but 150 or so years earlier it had appeared as mend one's manners.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

Recovering one's health, as in I heard you had the flu, but I'm glad to see you're on the mend. This idiom uses mend in the sense of "repair." [c. 1800]
See also: mend, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mend fences

or

mend your fences

COMMON If you mend fences or mend your fences, you do something to improve your relationship with someone you have argued with. Yesterday he was publicly criticised for not doing enough to mend fences with his big political rival. He had managed to annoy every member of the family and thought he'd better mend his fences. Note: You can call this process fence-mending. The king is out of the country on a fence-mending mission to the European Community.
See also: fence, mend

mend your ways

COMMON If someone mends their ways, they stop behaving badly or illegally and improve their behaviour. He seemed to accept his sentence meekly, promising to work hard in prison and to mend his ways. When asked if he intended to mend his ways, he told us `I'll try my best.'
See also: mend, way
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

mend (your) fences

make peace with a person.
This expression originated in the late 19th century in the USA, with reference to a member of Congress returning to his home town to keep in touch with the voters and to look after his interests there. Similar notions are conjured up by the saying good fences make good neighbours .
1994 Louis de Bernières Captain Corelli's Mandolin He knew assuredly he should go and mend his fences with the priest.
See also: fence, mend

mend your pace

go faster; alter your pace to match another's.
See also: mend, pace

on the mend

improving in health or condition; recovering.
See also: mend, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

be on the ˈmend

(informal, especially British English) be getting better after an illness or injury: Jan’s been very ill, but she’s on the mend now. OPPOSITE: on your/its last legs
See also: mend, on

make do and ˈmend

(especially British English) mend, repair or make things yourself instead of buying new things: We’ve all forgotten now how to make do and mend.
See also: and, make, mend

mend (your) ˈfences (with somebody)

(British English) find a solution to a disagreement with somebody: Is it too late to mend fences with your brother?
See also: fence, mend

mend your ˈways

(British English) improve your behaviour, way of living, etc: If Richard doesn’t mend his ways, they’ll throw him out of college.
See also: mend, way
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

mend fences

To improve poor relations, especially in politics: "Whatever thoughts he may have entertained about mending some fences with [them] were banished" (Conor Cruise O'Brien).
See also: fence, mend

on the mend

Improving, especially in health.
See also: mend, on
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mend one's fences, to

To strengthen one’s position by reestablishing good relations among one’s supporters. The term apparently came from a speech by Sen. John Sherman to his neighbors and friends in 1879 in Mansfield, Ohio, in which he said, “I have come home to look after my fences,” presumably literally meaning the fences around his farm there. (Indeed, mending fences is a major and time-consuming chore for nearly all American farmers.) However, the newspaper reports of the speech interpreted it as a political statement that meant Sherman was really home to campaign among his constituents. The term continued to be used in this way, with repair and mend substituted for look after. In the twentieth century it was broadened to mean placating personal, business, or professional contacts who might have felt neglected or offended and trying to regain their support. Vice President Al Gore used it after his defeat in the 2000 presidential election, saying he planned to mend his fences.
See also: mend
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Video:Star-Crossed - Our Toil Shall Strive to Mend Trailer Credit: Youtube.com/The CW Television Network
We'll meet again: Make do and mend designs from fashion students from Birmingham City University.
MEND programmes take place all across Wales.To register, call 0800 230 02 63.
Mend also claimed in a statement on Friday that its fighters had ambushed a convoy of Nigerian army gunboats and killed a number of soldiers, but Antigha said he was not aware of such an attack.
MEND and Mini-MEND are in part supported by lottery funding, but it appears expensive and funding is limited.
MEND consists of two hour sessions, twice a week for 10 weeks.
26) at MEND, said, "This collaboration will improve access to dental care in the San Fernando Valley.
The latest MEND courses, which start in the week beginning January 19, coincide with the government's launch of a nationwide healthy living campaign called Change4Life.
According to a report in Reuters, MEND, which is comprised of indigenous gunmen, said Thursday evening that the Israeli hostage "has been located and seems to be a diabetic patient." However, MEND wrote to Reuters that the offer of assistance "has been suspended until the Israel National News (Arutz Sheva) rescinds its description of MEND as a terrorist group and offer (sic) an apology in the next publication."
One role model is Hejazi Jaaberi, a MEND organizer in the West Bank city of Hebron, a security officer with the Palestinian Authority, and a man who believes in using nonviolent methods in engaging with prisoners.
Obasanjo had promised MEND in early April that he would use dialogue and carefully targeted development to return peace, law, and accountable government to the impoverished Niger Delta.
Kristin Clark Taylor, author of Mothers: Songs of Praise and Celebration, has released Black Fathers: A Call for Healing(Doubleday, January 2003, $22.95, ISBN 0-385-50249-4), an invitation for African American fathers to congratulate themselves, mend relationships and make a difference in their children's lives.
No wonder they call the organization MEND --Meet Each Need with Dignity.
The problem becomes clear as soon as you ask the author whom he considers the most reliable source for his explosive "revelation." His answer is that "the Mend protocol is quite reliable.
In response, the Clinton administration made efforts to "mend" them, enforcing "strict scrutiny" of DBEs.