mend


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hell mend (one)

An exclamation showing one's anger or irritation with someone else. I can't believe he stole my idea—hell mend him!
See also: hell, mend

be on the mend

To be in good health again after a period of injury or illness. Jill is happy to be on the mend after her hospital stay. Yes, I was sick earlier this week, but I'm on the mend now.
See also: mend, on

mend (one's) fences

To rectify a damaged relationship. After Jill heard that her father had become ill, she decided it was time for them to mend their fences before it was too late. The politician tried to mend his fences with his constituents after the scandal, but was not able to regain their trust before the next election.
See also: fence, mend

make do and mend

To have a minimal or meager amount of possessions, which one repairs rather than replaces. Growing up, my mother had to provide for three of us on her own, so we learned very quickly to make do and mend.
See also: and, make, mend

mend (one's) ways

To start behaving in a different, usually preferable, way. After I got in yet another fight at school, the headmaster told me that I had to mend my ways or else I'd be expelled. No matter how old you are, there is still time to mend your ways.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

Healing or getting well; improving in health. I broke my arm last month, so I've just been at home on the mend since then. A: "How's John doing?" B: "He had a rough week of it with the flu, but he's on the mend now, thank god."
See also: mend, on

It is never too late to mend.

Prov. It is never too late to apologize for something you have done or try to repair something you have done wrong. Sue: I still miss Tony, but it's been a year since our big fight and we haven't spoken to each other since. Mother: Well, it's never too late to mend; why don't you call him up and apologize?
See also: late, mend, never

mend

 (one's) fences
1. Lit. to repair fences as part of one's chores. Tom is mending fences today at the south end of the ranch.
2. Fig. to restore good relations (with someone). I think I had better get home and mend my fences. I had an argument with my daughter this morning. Sally called up her uncle to apologize and try to mend fences.

mend one's ways

Fig. to improve one's behavior. John used to be very wild, but he's mended his ways. You'll have to mend your ways if you go out with Mary. She hates people to be late.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

getting better; becoming healthy again. I cared for my father while he was on the mend. I took a leave of absence from work while I was on the mend.
See also: mend, on

mend one's fences

Improve poor relations; placate personal, political, or business contacts. For example, The senator always goes home weekends and spends time mending his fences. This metaphoric expression dates from an 1879 speech by Senator John Sherman in Mansfield, Ohio, to which he said he had returned "to look after my fences." Although he may have meant literally to repair the fences around his farm there, media accounts of the speech took him to mean campaigning among his constituents. In succeeding decades the term was applied to nonpolitical affairs as well.
See also: fence, mend

mend one's ways

Improve one's behavior, as in Threatened with suspension, Jerry promised to mend his ways. This expression, transferring a repair of clothes to one of character, was first recorded in 1868, but 150 or so years earlier it had appeared as mend one's manners.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

Recovering one's health, as in I heard you had the flu, but I'm glad to see you're on the mend. This idiom uses mend in the sense of "repair." [c. 1800]
See also: mend, on

mend fences

or

mend your fences

COMMON If you mend fences or mend your fences, you do something to improve your relationship with someone you have argued with. Yesterday he was publicly criticised for not doing enough to mend fences with his big political rival. He had managed to annoy every member of the family and thought he'd better mend his fences. Note: You can call this process fence-mending. The king is out of the country on a fence-mending mission to the European Community.
See also: fence, mend

mend your ways

COMMON If someone mends their ways, they stop behaving badly or illegally and improve their behaviour. He seemed to accept his sentence meekly, promising to work hard in prison and to mend his ways. When asked if he intended to mend his ways, he told us `I'll try my best.'
See also: mend, way

mend (your) fences

make peace with a person.
This expression originated in the late 19th century in the USA, with reference to a member of Congress returning to his home town to keep in touch with the voters and to look after his interests there. Similar notions are conjured up by the saying good fences make good neighbours .
1994 Louis de Bernières Captain Corelli's Mandolin He knew assuredly he should go and mend his fences with the priest.
See also: fence, mend

mend your pace

go faster; alter your pace to match another's.
See also: mend, pace

on the mend

improving in health or condition; recovering.
See also: mend, on

be on the ˈmend

(informal, especially British English) be getting better after an illness or injury: Jan’s been very ill, but she’s on the mend now. OPPOSITE: on your/its last legs
See also: mend, on

make do and ˈmend

(especially British English) mend, repair or make things yourself instead of buying new things: We’ve all forgotten now how to make do and mend.
See also: and, make, mend

mend (your) ˈfences (with somebody)

(British English) find a solution to a disagreement with somebody: Is it too late to mend fences with your brother?
See also: fence, mend

mend your ˈways

(British English) improve your behaviour, way of living, etc: If Richard doesn’t mend his ways, they’ll throw him out of college.
See also: mend, way

mend fences

To improve poor relations, especially in politics: "Whatever thoughts he may have entertained about mending some fences with [them] were banished" (Conor Cruise O'Brien).
See also: fence, mend

on the mend

Improving, especially in health.
See also: mend, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Launched in 2014 through leading New York City based medical practices, MEND has continued to gain rapid traction and interest from both consumers and medical professionals.
Marc Everett, Mend programme leader and community health food adviser for Sainsbury's, which is funding the course, said: "Mend has had a tremendous amount of success in England and has changed families' lives.
MEND was started in the 1970s out of a residential garage and has been operating for years out of the 10,000-square-foot warehouse.
Hours before Okah's release on Monday, Mend fighters killed five oil workers in an attack on an oil tanker wharf in Lagos, the country's most populous city and financial capital, in the first such operation outside the Niger Delta since starting its latest string of attacks.
If each individual who read Dennis McCarthy's column were to donate $1 or more to MEND, I wonder if that $1 million could be raised by Jan.
MEND programme manager, Juliette Jackson, said: "We're thrilled to have our work recognised and to receive such a prestigious award.
As of yet, there has been no official motivation, given by Mend, as to why they have called for this unilateral declaration of a ceasefire and there is still no reaction from the Nigerian government to this news," she said.
This holiday, those with a little extra after all the gift buying could do tremendous good by donating it to MEND.
Stuart Newton and his 11-year-old son Simon attended the council-run MEND programme earlier this year, and during the 10-week programme they both lost weight and became fitter, healthier and happier.
MEND has outgrown the 10,000-square-foot building in Pacoima, where only a decade ago it was helping 11,000 people a month keep their heads above water.
The new Lockheed Martin UCLA TeleHealth Suite and Lockheed Martin Outpatient Recovery Suites for the Wounded Warriors of Operation Mend were officially dedicated at a ceremony on Nov.
Mend Urgent Care is open 12 hours per day, 7 days per week and is accessible on a walk-in basis with no appointment necessary.
Maria Edwards, health care service manager for Mend in Wales, said: "Mend makes a real difference to children's lives through encouraging them to be more active and choose healthier options - children's fitness levels, self esteem and confidence increases.
com works with trusted manufacturers to provide consumers with high quality, low cost products, and the Vital Mend Health Coaches are the most knowledgeable in the industry, always staying a step ahead of the ever-changing vitamins and supplements, health and wellness world.
MEND is one of the largest militant groups in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria that fights for a greater share of the country's oil wealth.