meet one's match, to

meet one's match

Fig. to meet one's equal; to encounter someone who can match or outdo one in some activity, talent, etc. John played tennis with Bill yesterday, and it looks as if John has finally met his match. Listen to Jane and Mary argue. I always thought that Jane was loud, but she has finally met her match.
See also: match, meet

meet one's match

Encounter someone equal in ability to oneself, as in The chess champion was about to meet his match in a computer. This expression originated about 1300 as find one's match, but the alliterative meet was being used by the mid-1500s and has survived.
See also: match, meet

meet your match

COMMON If you meet your match, you find that you are competing or fighting with someone who is as good as you or is better than you. The United manager, Alex Ferguson, admitted that his team had met their match in Chelsea. The boxer's bruised and bloodied face showed he had met his match in Lewis.
See also: match, meet

meet your match

encounter your equal in strength or ability.
See also: match, meet

meet one's match, to

To encounter a person who is one’s equal in ability. This term began life as to find one’s match, a locution that dates back to the fourteenth century or earlier. “He fond his mecche,” wrote Robert Manning of Brunnea (The Story of England, ca. 1330). By the late sixteenth century the alliterative meet had been substituted and has survived to the present day.
See also: meet