medicine


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Related to medicine: Prescription drugs

a dose of (one's) own medicine

An experience of the same harmful or unpleasant thing that one has inflicted on others or an attack in the same manner in which one attacks others. John has gossiped about everyone in our group, so we gave him a dose of his own medicine by spreading rumors about him. The coup gave the dictatorship a dose of its own medicine, subjecting the dictator and his entourage to torture and confinement in deplorable conditions.
See also: dose, medicine, of, own

a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down

Something good makes something bad more tolerable. I'm going to put on some fun background music while I work on this boring project because a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.
See also: down, help, medicine, of, sugar

give (one) a taste of (one's) own medicine

To do the same harmful or unpleasant thing that one has inflicted on others or to attack in the same manner in which one attacks others. Bill is always excluding me from things, so I'm going to give him a taste of his own medicine and not invite him to my party. This team likes to play tough defense, so let's give them a taste of their own medicine and not give them any space to score.
See also: give, medicine, of, own, taste

socialized medicine

A system of national healthcare that is funded by taxes and provided to people by the government. Ever since I got sick, my medical expenses have been so outrageous that I'm thinking of moving to a country that has socialized medicine.
See also: medicine

a taste of (one's) own medicine

An experience of the same harmful or unpleasant thing that one has inflicted on others; an attack in the same manner in which one attacks others. Doug is a bully—of course he won't like it when his victims fight back and give him a taste of his own medicine. This team likes to play rough, so let's go out there and give them a taste of their own medicine!
See also: medicine, of, own, taste

give (one) a dose of (one's) own medicine

To do the same harmful or unpleasant thing that one has inflicted on others or to attack in the same manner in which one attacks others. Bill is always excluding me from things, so I'm going to give him a dose of his own medicine and not invite him to my party. This team likes to play tough defense, so let's give them a dose of their own medicine and not give them any space to score.
See also: dose, give, medicine, of, own

laughter is the best medicine

Laughing a lot is a very effective means of recovering from physical or mental injury. More generally, keeping a positive outlook on life will help combat negative emotions during hard times. I think the best thing for you right now would be to spend some time with people you can joke around with. Laughter is the best medicine, after all.
See also: laughter, medicine

take (one's) medicine

To accept and do what has to without complaint or protest, especially when it is unpleasant or difficult. Though he didn't agree with the two-game suspension, he took his medicine and didn't gripe about it to the media. Hopefully the election result will send a clear message to the losing party, and they'll finally take their medicine and do what's right for the country.
See also: medicine, take

snakebite medicine

Inf. inferior whiskey; strong whiskey; homemade whiskey. That old-time snakebite medicine is good for what ails you. snakebite medicine is a tremendous protection against snakebites if you can get the snake to drink the stuff before it bites you.
See also: medicine

take one's medicine

Fig. to accept the consequences or the bad fortune that one deserves. (Alludes to having to take unpleasant-tasting medicine.) I know I did wrong, and I know I have to take my medicine. Billy knew he was going to get spanked, and he didn't want to take his medicine.
See also: medicine, take

*a taste of one's own medicine

 and *a dose of one's own medicine
Fig. a sample of the unpleasantness that one has been giving other people. (Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) Now you see how it feels to have someone call you names! You are getting a taste of your own medicine! John, who is often rude and abrupt with people, was devastated when the teacher treated him rudely. He doesn't like having a dose of his own medicine.
See also: medicine, of, own, taste

dose of one's own medicine

Also, taste of one's own medicine. Repayment or retaliation, as in It's time we gave them a dose of their own medicine and simply forget to call them back , or Joe was upset at being left out, but they were just giving him a taste of his own medicine . [Late 1800s]
See also: dose, medicine, of, own

take one's medicine

Put up with unpleasantness, learn one's lesson. For example, After failing math, he had to take his medicine and go to summer school. This idiom uses medicine in the sense of "a bitter-tasting remedy." [Mid-1800s]
See also: medicine, take

give someone a taste of their own medicine

or

give someone a dose of their own medicine

If you give someone a taste of their own medicine or a dose of their own medicine, you treat them badly in the same way that they treated you. The famously aggressive interviewer was given a taste of his own medicine today when one caller asked him a series of very direct questions. I haven't called him for over a week. Giving him a dose of his own medicine — see how he likes it.
See also: give, medicine, of, own, someone, taste

a dose (or taste) of your own medicine

the same bad treatment that you have given to others.
The idea of taking or receiving your own medicine has been in metaphorical use since the mid 19th century.
1994 Eoin McNamee Resurrection Man Every time you turn on the telly there's some politician talking the mouth off himself, dose of their own medicine's what they want.
See also: dose, medicine, of, own

the best ˈmedicine

the best way of improving a situation, especially of making you feel happier: Laughter is the best medicine.
See also: medicine

give somebody a taste/dose of their own ˈmedicine

treat somebody in the same unpleasant, unkind, rude, etc. way that they have treated you: Give her a dose of her own medicine and make her wait for you. Then maybe she won’t be so slow next time.

take your ˈmedicine (like a ˈman)

(usually humorous) accept something unpleasant, for example, punishment, without protesting or complaining: He really hates shopping, but he goes anyway and takes his medicine like a man.
See also: medicine, take

snakebite medicine

n. inferior whiskey; strong whiskey; homemade whiskey. Snakebite medicine is a tremendous protection against snakebites if you can get the snake to drink the stuff before it tries to bite you.
See also: medicine
References in classic literature ?
Boys ought to know, after all, that medicine, taken in time, can save them from much pain and even from death.
I did not lose the gold pieces, but I swallowed them when I drank the medicine.
I go to bring my medicines, men of the king," I answered.
Then I took him and wrapped him up in my bundle of medicines, and outside of all I rolled a mat of plaited grass.
He really thought this was true, and Wendy, who was now in her night-gown, believed it also, and she said, to encourage Michael, "That medicine you sometimes take, father, is much nastier, isn't it?
It will soon be over, father," John said cheerily, and then in rushed Wendy with the medicine in a glass.
I will make no medicine," he said, "until I have the goats and the mat and the copper wire.
Bukawai, fearful lest he should lose any recompense, followed Momaya with the intention of persuading her to part with her ornaments of copper and iron against her return with the price of the medicine--to pay, as it were, for an option on his services as one pays a retaining fee to an attorney, for, like an attorney, Bukawai knew the value of his medicine and that it was well to collect as much as possible in advance.
Nor would you say that medicine is the art of receiving pay because a man takes fees when he is engaged in healing?
But the truth is, that while the art of medicine gives health, and the art of the builder builds a house, another art attends them which is the art of pay.
But scarcely had the train passed the river, when the bridge, completely ruined, fell with a crash into the rapids of Medicine Bow.
Here Captain Bonneville detached a second party of trappers, consisting of ten men, to seek and join those whom he had detached while on the route; appointing for them the same rendezvous, (at the Medicine Lodge,) on the 28th of August.
Captain Bonneville being now left to prosecute his trapping campaign without rivalry, set out, on the 17th of August, for the rendezvous at Medicine Lodge.
The ways of a great medicine are not like the ways of other men.
He was very learned in all languages, and knew a great deal about herbs and medicines.