mean for

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mean for

1. To intend for something to be received, heard, or understood by a particular person. A noun or pronoun can be used between "mean" and "for"; often used in passive constructions. Sorry, my question was actually meant for Mrs. Roberts. I never meant those criticisms for you! You ate them all? But those cookies were meant for the children!
2. To be of importance, significance, or worth to one. A noun or pronoun can be used between "mean" and "for." It's hard to quantify what this amazing gift means for our community, but suffice to say that it will change many lives for the better. Criticism like that doesn't mean anything for me.
See also: mean

mean something for someone or something

 
1. Lit. to imply something important for someone or something; to be important or meaningful for someone or something. Are your comments supposed to mean something special for me? I mean these remarks for the government.
2. Fig. to intend for someone or something to have or receive something. Do you mean this gift for me? I mean this gift for the entire community.
See also: mean
References in classic literature ?
"Certainly I do; and your mistake has been in supposing that an experiment which no few every-day married couples would be only too glad to try, was ever meant for two such love-birds as you.
4 : to intend for a particular use <It's a book meant for children.>
It matters not how you or I might want to take the word arsenokoites; what matters is what it originally meant for Paul in his context.
However, if we demote meaning and instead promote body image and ego, then our inclination towards perfection, meant for our inner qualities, will transfer to the perfection of externals.
According to that document, actualization begins with a correct interpretation of what the scripture text meant for its own time, which is followed by three steps: hearing the text from within one's own situation, identifying the aspects of the present situation highlighted by the text, and drawing from the text the meaning in a way that advances the will of God.
Christ by his death or the shedding of his blood has achieved for humanity once and for all what the Day of Atonement ritual meant for Israel of old: He has become the new "seat of mercy." But it is not Pauline teaching that the Father willed the death of the Son to satisfy the debts owed to God by human sinners.