mean

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Related to means: means test, Means to an End

a mean (something)

Said of something that is particularly impressive or appealing. I make a mean stew—are you sure you don't want to stay for dinner? You should ask that guy to join your band—he plays a mean sax.
See also: mean

mean something

 (to someone)
1. Lit. to make sense to someone. Does this line mean anything to you? Yes, it means something.
2. Fig. [for someone] to cause positive feelings in another person. You mean a lot to me. This job means a lot to Ann.

mean

mod. having to do with someone or something that is very good; cool. This music is mean, man, mean. What a great sound!
See:
References in classic literature ?
It is much easier to say definitely what a word means than what an image means, since words, however they originated, have been framed in later times for the purpose of having meaning, and men have been engaged for ages in giving increased precision to the meanings of words.
At the same time, it is possible to conduct rudimentary thought by means of images, and it is important, sometimes, to check purely verbal thought by reference to what it means.
The things that words mean differ more than words do.
In considering what words mean, it is natural to start with proper names, and we will again take "Napoleon" as our instance.
There is a large class of words, such as "eating," "walking," "speaking," which mean a set of similar occurrences.
We have thus, in addition to our four previous ways in which words can mean, two new ways, namely the way of memory and the way of imagination.
In all these ways the causal laws concerning images are connected with the causal laws concerning the objects which the images "mean." An image may thus come to fulfil the function of a general idea.
'In spring, when woods are getting green, I'll try and tell you what I mean.'
Daf:ur habe ich, aus reinische Verlegenheit--no, Vergangenheit--no, I mean Hoflichkeit--aus reinishe Hoflichkeit habe ich resolved to tackle this business in the German language, um Gottes willen!
That the phone is ringing usually means that someone is calling the number--but not always.
(5) Kott means a bag in Estonian (which is Uralic, like Finnish).
This poem means whether you are loved or left, whether you love
: wealth 1 <A person of means doesn't worry about money.>
As a result, virtually every reviewer/critic has a whole arsenal of "hooray" or "boo" words, which really mean very little in themselves and owe their value to how much the reader credits their source.
The reason I keep asking "What does that mean?" is because people keep making up complicated names for simple things, just so they can make themselves feel a little more superior or more intellectual.