mean

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a mean (something)

Said of something that is particularly impressive or appealing. I make a mean stew—are you sure you don't want to stay for dinner? You should ask that guy to join your band—he plays a mean sax.
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mean something

 (to someone)
1. Lit. to make sense to someone. Does this line mean anything to you? Yes, it means something.
2. Fig. [for someone] to cause positive feelings in another person. You mean a lot to me. This job means a lot to Ann.

mean

mod. having to do with someone or something that is very good; cool. This music is mean, man, mean. What a great sound!
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References in periodicals archive ?
Addressing ordinary meanness paves the way toward more caring communities.
In this section we characterize the meanness of some Duplicate graphs.
After deducting "strength points" from "weakness points" she assigned each firm a "meanness score".
After some discussion about the permanent harmful effects bullying and meanness can have on someone, the campers pass the picture, which is now a tiny little ball of paper, around for a second time.
While several recent popular books address the topic of girls' "meanness" to one another, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area.
Defeated by his quest for shine, Boy Boy projects his frustrations onto his wife, who then converts her anger at him into fuel for a meanness that will give her life meaning but will damage her children.
A little man with a foul mouth, a fearful volatility, and a basic meanness.
Actually, conservatives have been doing quite well in the meanness sweepstakes, thanks largely to the impressive efforts of Ann Coulter.
For the protagonists the descent from lofty ambition to mundane realities is inevitable because of the discrepancy between the grandeur of their aspirations and the meanness of opportunity, which causes them to modify or abandon their goals.Dorothea, Lydgate and Ladislaw represent a wish to live by values higher than the values of Middlemarch.
All the strange secrets of the past, humanity's meanness, loneliness, survival: basic subjects, maybe, but surely the building blocks of any great art.
Meanness, the very thing which is unforgivable in human social life, in poetry is thrilling and valuable.
"There is a lot less physical fighting and interpersonal meanness and putdowns--that unhappy stuff that happens all the time in most schools," Shapiro adds.
Childhood meanness always has been a part of growing up--taunting other youngsters, playing malicious practical jokes, including gossip and put-downs, vying for pecking order in snobbish (or rebel) cliques.
Small gestures--reaching, touching--revealed a meanness as well.
They can not conceptualize meanness or acts of purposeful injury to others.