mean (something) as (something else)

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mean (something) as (something else)

To have a particular meaning or intention when saying or doing something. Often used in negative constructions. I didn't mean that as an insult—on the contrary, I meant it as a compliment! I don't think he meant it as a snub to you when he turned his back like that. I think he just wasn't thinking about how it would come across.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

mean something as something

to intend something to be understood as something. Do you mean your remarks as criticism? I meant my comment as encouragement.
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McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When we examine meaning as the validation of truth claims our focus is on the kinds of evidence offered as support for analytical, empirical and value claims.
To summarize these last ideas, meaning as verification of truth claims involves logic and methods which may not be strongly contextual, but the values underlying such claims, and the motivation for researching certain questions, do spring from context.
Surely the narratives of the Hebrew scriptures, as pregnant with meaning as they are, are also subject to the radical suspicion that the Shoah itself thrust upon them.
Yet, for this reader at least, too much of her book is taken up with highly abstract assertions about multiplicity, ambiguity, destabilization, or absence of meaning as values in themselves - opposed to "lucid truth" (57), "transcendent meaning" (58), a "single authoritative historically correct meaning" (74), "utterly fixed and certain" meanings (79).
Yet when Hans Hoffman admonished Jackson Pollock to eschew subjective expression and stick to the natural world, Pollock succinctly replied, "But I am nature" Ironically, it was Hoffman who altered his approach: his work blossomed in intensity and meaning as it took on Surrealist qualities.
Do not molesters, murderers, mass murderers, and terrorists often invoke some sacred being or meaning as cause or justification for their actions?