mean to

mean to (do something)

To have the intention, desire, or obligation to do something. I've been meaning to see that new movie everyone is talking about. A: "Did you mow the lawn?" B: "No, I meant to do it yesterday, but I ran out of time."
See also: mean

mean to (one)

To be of importance, significance, or worth to one. A noun or pronoun can be used between "mean" and "to." It's hard to quantify what this amazing gift means to our community, but suffice to say that it will change many lives for the better. Criticism like that doesn't mean anything to me—I just let it roll off me like water off a duck's back.
See also: mean

mean to (do something)

to intend to do something. Did you mean to do that? No, it was an accident. I didn't mean to.
See also: mean

mean to

Intend to, as in I meant to go running this morning but got up too late, or I'm sorry I broke it-I didn't mean to. This idiom was first recorded in 1560.
See also: mean
References in classic literature ?
'I meant by "impenetrability" that we've had enough of that subject, and it would be just as well if you'd mention what you mean to do next, as I suppose you don't mean to stop here all the rest of your life.'
Some embrace suits, which never mean to deal effectually in them; but if they see there may be life in the matter, by some other mean, they will be content to win a thank, or take a second reward, or at least to make use, in the meantime, of the suitor's hopes.
When Simonides said that the repayment of a debt was justice, he did not mean to include that case?
I suppose Martha Mulwash did not mean to kill that baby when she dosed it with Dalby and soothing syrups; but she did kill it, and was tried for manslaughter."
"Bill Starkey," continued John, "did not mean to frighten his brother into fits when he dressed up like a ghost and ran after him in the moonlight; but he did; and that bright, handsome little fellow, that might have been the pride of any mother's heart is just no better than an idiot, and never will be, if he lives to be eighty years old.
In the present task I have not got beyond this:--I am bent on finding Lizzie, and I mean to find her, and I will take any means of finding her that offer themselves.
Featuring a black child who embarks on the dream of creating a thriving business of her own, What Does It Mean To Be An Entrepreneur?
Agents can mean to do such and such--they can intend to do such and such.
3 : to have in mind as a purpose : intend <I mean to win.> <He meant to be funny.>
Then there are the slightly more subtle weapons in the critical armory--such as "stylish" or its booful equivalent, "unstylish." Sure, this means something to the writer who knows the style he or she is looking for, but how much does it mean to a reader?
He gives as an example the word "understand" and notes that understand does not mean to stand under.
I don't mean to imply that teachers ought to avoid making the topic interesting or entertaining.
Both to ensure and to insure also mean to make certain of something.
I do not mean to disparage technology, only its inadmissible use.
Over the last two years, I have read and spoken so much Spanish that my French is now changed: I unconsciously say y when I mean to say et.