matter to (one)

(redirected from mattering to)

matter to (one)

To be of importance, significance, or worth to one. If success really matters to you so much that you would sacrifice your friends to get it, then I don't want to be your friend to begin with. A: "Do you want to keep or get rid of these books." B: "IT doesn't matter to me—do whatever's easier." It doesn't matter to the boss what's going on in your home life. All she cares about is whether you get your work done on time or not.
See also: matter

matter to someone

to be important to someone. Does money really matter to you? Yes, it matters to me a lot.
See also: matter
References in periodicals archive ?
Corbiere and Amundson (2007) suggested that counselors can evaluate the level of working alliance by measuring clients' perceived mattering to their counselors.
In this initial article, although Rosenberg and McCullough emphasized mattering to specific others, they simply used the term mattering instead of interpersonal mattering.
One example of change was that Rosenberg (1985) categorized mattering into two types when he added societal mattering to interpersonal mattering.
Their findings suggested that both holistic wellness and mattering positively influenced job satisfaction, but compared with holistic wellness, the contribution of mattering to job satisfaction was small.
Mattering to others involves individuals' perceptions that they are important and are valued by other people in interpersonal relationships and within systems.
Mattering to others complements what we know about the childhood and adolescent periods of the lifespan, rife with rapidly changing emotions and frequent questioning of self (Kroger, 1999).
In other words, mattering to another person most often occurs between two people and belonging is conceptualized as belonging to larger groups of individuals (Baumeister & Leary, 1995; Dixon Rayle, 2005).
Assessments of students' perceptions of mattering in individual and small group counseling can take the form of mattering-based pre-surveys and post-surveys that focus on students' perceptions of mattering to their school counselor or others (i.e., the General Mattering Scale by Marcus & Kitayama [1991] or the Mattering to Others Questionnaire by Marshall [2001]), but they also can take place throughout counseling with verbal check-ins.
Mattering to others, the fundamental need that individuals have to feel important and significant to others, has recently resurfaced in the social sciences literature.
In the early 1980s, Morris Rosenberg (Rosenberg & McCullough, 1981) first conceptualized mattering as an integral component of individuals' self-concepts; he hypothesized that all individuals experience varying perceptions of general mattering (mattering in a broad sense to society) and of interpersonal mattering (mattering to specific other people).
In other words, despite objective indicators (that others explicitly display) that we matter, if we do not intrapersonally recognize and believe that we matter, we will not actually experience mattering to others.
The experience of not mattering to others allows for a deeper understanding of just how important mattering to others may be.
Participants completed the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, the Stephenson Multigroup Acculturation Scale, the General Mattering Scale, the Mattering to Others Questionnaire, and the Wellness Evaluation of Life Style-Teenage.
These included: the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM; Phinney, 1992), the Stephenson Multigroup Acculturation Scale (SMAS; Stephenson, 2000), the General Mattering Scale (GMS; Marcus, 1991), the Mattering to Others Questionnaire (MTOQ; Marshall, 1998), the Wellness Evaluation of Lifestyle-Teenage version (WEL-T; Myers & Sweeney, 2001), and a demographic questionnaire that assessed a variety of descriptors including ethnicity, length of time participants had lived in the United States, and average time spent with family and friends.
Both of these studies support the idea that higher levels of mattering to others lead to higher levels of overall wellness.