matter


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Importance is the experience of being the object of support and concern to others who matter.
It's exciting to wonder if it could be dark matter interacting with itself," says Neal Weiner, a theoretical physicist at New York University.
The nature of dark matter is a mystery - a mystery that the new study has only deepened.
At the end, it won't matter where you came from, or on what side of the tracks you lived.
By studying the collision carefully, scientists now say that they have found the first evidence of dark matter in the universe.
As planned, the new particulate matter standards are stiffer than current pollution limits, but they're more relaxed than what the EPA's own scientific advisory council recommended.
The consultants conclude that a trusting relationship with "25 or 30 randomly selected employees among tens of thousands doesn't matter.
A little-known group with an unwieldy name--the Primate's Theological Commission--has begun work on a question put to it by General Synod last year: is the blessing of same-sex relationships a matter of doctrine, that is, something essential to the Christian faith as expressed by the Anglican church, or not?
Rather, minority participants perceive they matter less than nonminority adolescents do, and their level of ethnic identity is what significantly predicts their wellness, which was not the case when all participants were considered together.
What Matters: Matter, said Einstein, is the same/as energy; force isn't solid/but has its moment, can mass/when concentrated, then/matters very much.
The term "genetics and genomics subject matter" as used in this initiative does not, however, include such subject matter as biomedical devices, engineered tissues, stem cells, large-scale cell culture, whole organism cloning, or individual treatment applications.
The most famous of these was the 1995 Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), the main subject of Why Schools Matter.
Measuring patient progress is not as simple a matter as it might seem since there are many potential indicators with perhaps the most obvious being length of treatment.
With the signing of a recent agreement, NIST has joined an interagency effort led by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)--the National Particulate Matter Research Program--aimed at improving the nation's air quality and public health.
When we question them about their taciturn manner, they all give us the same two reasons: They really don't care one way or the other and they're convinced that what they say doesn't matter anyhow.