mast


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Related to mast: Mast cells

nail (one's) colors to the mast

To refuse to cease or surrender. Because lowering a ship's flag was a customary indication of surrender, this nautical phrase emphasizes the resolve of a ship's crew. We will nail our colors to the mast and fight on—they will never capture us! We're going to have a tough time beating this team now that they are playing with such determination. I fear they've nailed their colors to the mast.
See also: color, mast, nail

at half-mast

Partially raised or lowered. The phrase most often describes a flag that has been lowered to honor a recently-deceased person. After our former president died, flags were at half-mast all across the country. My daughter came home from the park covered in dirt, her ponytail at half-mast.

be at half-mast

To be partially raised or lowered. The phrase most often describes a flag that has been lowered to honor a recently-deceased person. After our former president died, flags were at half-mast all across the country. When my daughter came home from the park, she was covered in dirt, and her ponytail was at half-mast.

nail (one's) colours to the mast

To refuse to cease or surrender. Because lowering a ship's flag was a customary indication of surrender, this nautical phrase emphasizes the resolve of a ship's crew. We will nail our colours to the mast and fight on—they will never capture us! We're going to have a tough time beating this team now that they are playing with such determination. I fear they've nailed their colours to the mast.
See also: colour, mast, nail

at half-mast

 and at half-staff
[of a flag] halfway up or down its flagpole. The flag was flying at half-mast because the general had died. Americans fly flags at half-staff on Memorial Day.

at half-mast

Halfway up or down, as in The church bells tolled off and on all day and the flags were at half-mast. This term refers to placing a flag halfway up a ship's mast or flagpole, a practice used as a mark of respect for a person who has died or, at sea, as a distress signal. Occasionally the term is transferred to other objects, as in Tom's pants were at half-mast as he raced around the playground, or The puppy's tail was at half-mast. [First half of 1600s]

nail your colours to the mast

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
1. If you nail your colours to the mast, you state your opinions or beliefs about something clearly and publicly. Note: A ship's colours are its national flag. Let me nail my colours to the mast straightaway. I both like and admire him immensely.
2. If you nail your colours to the mast, you say clearly and publicly that you support a particular person, idea, or theory. Note: A ship's colours are its national flag. In the Thatcher years, the young MP nailed his colours to Mrs T's mast more firmly than most. This was the moment he nailed his colours to the mast of Social Security reform. Note: Battleships used to lower their colours to show that they were surrendering. Sometimes the colours were nailed to the mast as a sign of determination to fight to the end.
See also: colour, mast, nail

nail (or pin) your colours to the mast

declare openly and firmly what you believe or favour.
See also: colour, mast, nail

nail your colours to the ˈmast

(especially British English) show clearly which side you support: It’s time to nail our colours to the mast and condemn this dreadful policy. OPPOSITE: sit on the fenceIn this expression, colours are flags. In a battle at sea, a ship would nail its colours to the mast to show its intention to continue fighting and not surrender.
See also: colour, mast, nail
References in periodicals archive ?
By culturing the mast cell progenitor cells present in blood, which are relatively uncommon (about 10 cells per million white blood cells), the researchers found that mast cell progenitors could survive, divide and partially mature without stem cell factor.
This study showed a significant mast cell count when compared with the normal and inflamed appendices.
In the first half of the 1990s, Germany's Carl Zeiss (now Airbus Defence and Space) began the preliminary development of its Optronic Mast System (OMS).
Staining patterns were compared with those of nonneoplastic mast cells in staging bone marrow specimens that were negative for malignant neoplasm obtained from patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
The Mast cell counts were ranged from 59 to 99 / 10 HPF with a mean of 78.
The developer, however, says it plans to re-erect the mast in "the very near future".
Amac: Bu arastirmada, pterjium patogenezinde mast hucrelerinin rolu ve primer pterjium ile nuks pterjium dokularindaki mast huete sayilarinin karsilastirilmasi amaclandi.
Mast cells in mammals arise from a heterogenous myelomonocytic cell population originating in the bone marrow.
Mast said in both cases, prosecutors told him that if he pleaded guilty before a trial, they would not seek jail time.
Officers from South Wales Police were in attendance yesterday at a peaceful demonstration staged by more than 30 adults and children on the site of a planned O2 mast opposite the post office in Heol Llanishen Fach, Rhiwbina, Cardiff.
They are believed to circle them until they collide with the mast, its support wires or each other.
The purpose of this study was to develop a new type of guyed mast that incorporates a complex guy cable System with a particular focus on the effect of static loading on the response mast behaviour.
THREE quarters of Bahrain's 1,777 telecom masts are not licensed, MPs were told yesterday.
Councillors in Bahrain are demanding an investigation after it emerged 160 illegal phone masts have sprung up across the Central Governorate.
A CRUCIFIX made from the twisted remains of one of Rugby's fallen telephone masts is taking pride of place in a graveyard.