mast


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Related to mast: Mast cells

nail (one's) colors to the mast

To refuse to cease or surrender. Because lowering a ship's flag was a customary indication of surrender, this nautical phrase emphasizes the resolve of a ship's crew. We will nail our colors to the mast and fight on—they will never capture us! We're going to have a tough time beating this team now that they are playing with such determination. I fear they've nailed their colors to the mast.
See also: color, mast, nail

at half-mast

Partially raised or lowered. The phrase most often describes a flag that has been lowered to honor a recently-deceased person. After our former president died, flags were at half-mast all across the country. My daughter came home from the park covered in dirt, her ponytail at half-mast.

be at half-mast

To be partially raised or lowered. The phrase most often describes a flag that has been lowered to honor a recently-deceased person. After our former president died, flags were at half-mast all across the country. When my daughter came home from the park, she was covered in dirt, and her ponytail was at half-mast.

nail (one's) colours to the mast

To refuse to cease or surrender. Because lowering a ship's flag was a customary indication of surrender, this nautical phrase emphasizes the resolve of a ship's crew. We will nail our colours to the mast and fight on—they will never capture us! We're going to have a tough time beating this team now that they are playing with such determination. I fear they've nailed their colours to the mast.
See also: colour, mast, nail

at half-mast

 and at half-staff
[of a flag] halfway up or down its flagpole. The flag was flying at half-mast because the general had died. Americans fly flags at half-staff on Memorial Day.

at half-mast

Halfway up or down, as in The church bells tolled off and on all day and the flags were at half-mast. This term refers to placing a flag halfway up a ship's mast or flagpole, a practice used as a mark of respect for a person who has died or, at sea, as a distress signal. Occasionally the term is transferred to other objects, as in Tom's pants were at half-mast as he raced around the playground, or The puppy's tail was at half-mast. [First half of 1600s]

nail your colours to the mast

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
1. If you nail your colours to the mast, you state your opinions or beliefs about something clearly and publicly. Note: A ship's colours are its national flag. Let me nail my colours to the mast straightaway. I both like and admire him immensely.
2. If you nail your colours to the mast, you say clearly and publicly that you support a particular person, idea, or theory. Note: A ship's colours are its national flag. In the Thatcher years, the young MP nailed his colours to Mrs T's mast more firmly than most. This was the moment he nailed his colours to the mast of Social Security reform. Note: Battleships used to lower their colours to show that they were surrendering. Sometimes the colours were nailed to the mast as a sign of determination to fight to the end.
See also: colour, mast, nail

nail (or pin) your colours to the mast

declare openly and firmly what you believe or favour.
See also: colour, mast, nail

nail your colours to the ˈmast

(especially British English) show clearly which side you support: It’s time to nail our colours to the mast and condemn this dreadful policy. OPPOSITE: sit on the fenceIn this expression, colours are flags. In a battle at sea, a ship would nail its colours to the mast to show its intention to continue fighting and not surrender.
See also: colour, mast, nail

nail one's colors to the mast

Adopt an unyielding attitude. This nineteenth-century expression alludes to flying a flag from a ship’s mast. If the flag is nailed to the mast, it cannot be hauled down. Sir Walter Scott may have been the first to put it in writing: “Stood for his country’s glory fast, And nailed her colours to the mast” (Marmion, 1808). Although the days of flag-flying sailing ships are in the past, the expression lives on. It appeared in Great Outdoors (Sept. 27, 1989): “The prince neatly side-stepped nailing his colours to the mast in the national parks debate.”
See also: color, mast, nail
References in periodicals archive ?
Tractors move in to clear the rubble of the collapsed mast as the new temporary BBC2 mast is started ANDREW VARLEY
Rising out of the rubble of the TV mast that collapsed at Emley Moor, is a new 307ft temporary mast.
Pathology of the Mast Cell Tumour in a Chippiparai Dog.
Prognosis following surgical excision of canine cutaneous mast cell tumours with histopathologically tumour-free versus incompletely resected canine mast cell tumours: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.
Mast cell activation can lead to release of three distinct classes of bioactive molecules, depending on the type of stimuli and receptor involved: preformed mediators stored in their granules that are rapidly released (within seconds to minutes); de novo synthesized lipid mediators, prostaglandins, and leukotrienes (minutes); and a variety of cytokines and chemokines that are produced following their transcription and translation (hours).
Mast cell degranulation is also observed in many IgE-independent processes, such as degranulation induced by thrombin, IgG complexes, neuropeptides, and complement-derived anaphylatoxins [44-47].
They were thus able to conclude that mast cell progenitors did not require stem cell factor.
Under the deal, the stockholders of Savara would become the majority owners of Mast. The all-stock deal values Mast at USD 36.5m.
Bonferroni test showed a significant difference in the mast cell count between acute appendicitis and chronic appendicitis; there was a significant difference in the mast cell count between chronic appendicitis and appendix not showing features of inflammation.
This is a low-profile mast combining the features of the company's conventional Model 76IR search periscope and its Model 86 optronic mast (see above).
Mast tends to be very high in carbohydrates, so wild animals can use it to quickly put on weight and improve body condition after the typical summer nutritional stress period.
Staining patterns were compared with those of nonneoplastic mast cells in staging bone marrow specimens that were negative for malignant neoplasm obtained from patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
Studies on mast cells in normal and various pathologic conditions have shown them to be complex, well-engineered, and multi functional cells playing an essential role in acquired and innate immunity.
Committee vice-chairman MP Adnan Al Malki claimed telecom masts were a main source of illness and sickness among children, when they are erected near schools and kindergartens - despite studies
"What we want is to resolve these masts situation and organise it instead of the chaos we are witnessing.