marry (someone) for (his or her) money

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marry (someone) for (his or her) money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying Donald for his money. I think it's quite sad that people would marry for money rather than true love of their spouse.
See also: marry, money
References in classic literature ?
Rachel was dreadfully afraid that Anne was going to make the mistake of marrying for money.
When one lives in the world, a man or woman's marrying for money is too common to strike one as it ought.
But depending on your point of view, whether marrying for money, love and romance, or convenience -- you'll either disapprove of writer Howard, or you'll say, "Go girl
Spouses are often afraid to question a prenuptial agreement because they do not want to be perceived as marrying for money.
Marrying for love and marrying for money, however, become increasingly difficult to distinguish.
But the cynics and cod-psychologists are already casting doubt on the love match, bitchily suggesting that Elle is marrying for money and repeating the mistakes of past relationships.
Nathaniel Phillips, who build his fortune through Jamaican sugar plantations, winning a duel and marrying for money, bought the estate in 1795.
His comments on widows marrying for money is very cynical.
On reading the recent House of Lords decisions in the cases of Melissa Miller and Julia McFarlane, you may wonder whether it is a charter for "gold-diggers" to get rich by marrying for money.
Norris are a natural consequence of marrying for money.
After marrying for money, however, she realizes that she is still unhappy and plots against her husband (John Wesley Shipp).
After exposing details of stag night shenanigans and previous relationships, he adds that his mate is really marrying for money.
The Duke resents his privileged position and would rather be an inventor but finds himself forced into marrying for money - until a chance encounter catapults him into the future.
Marrying for a home was called "servitude," marrying for money "bargain and sale" by Muzzey.
The survey found that love was the overwhelming reason for getting wed, with just 2 per cent of admitting to marrying for money.