marry


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marry the gunner's daughter

obsolete naval Of a seaman, to be bound to a cannon or other such armament and flogged or lashed as corporal punishment. The first mate ended up marrying the gunner's daughter for attempting to bring about a mutiny on the ship.
See also: daughter, marry

marry beneath (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath herself with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry

marry above (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above her station, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above one's station.
See also: above, marry, station

marry into money

To become wealthy or financially secure by marrying someone who is wealthy or has a wealthy family. Ever since he married into money, George has been flaunting all of the exotic vacations he and his new wife take. During college, when I had barely enough money to eat each day, I vowed that someday I'd marry into money and start living a much more comfortable life.
See also: marry, money

marry (someone) for (his or her) money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying Donald for his money. I think it's quite sad that people would marry for money rather than true love of their spouse.
See also: marry, money

never marry for money, but marry where money is

Wealth should not be one's primary focus in choosing a spouse, but it is an important consideration. A: "My fiancée is not exactly rich, but she does have a well-paying job." B: "That's good. Never marry for money, but marry where money is."
See also: but, marry, money, never

be (not) the marrying kind

To be a person who is interested in getting married. This phrase is often used in the negative to convey a disinterest in or opposition to marriage. Considering how many the women he's dated in the past year alone, Jack is not the marrying kind! Oh, you're the marrying kind—you just haven't met the right person yet.
See also: kind, marry

marry above (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above herself, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above oneself.
See also: above, marry

marry below (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below her station with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry, station

marry below (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below herself with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry

marry beneath (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath her station with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry, station

marry in haste, repent at leisure

If you marry someone without being certain that you should, you will regret it for a long time. She's only known him for three months! You know what they say—marry in haste, repent at leisure.
See also: leisure, marry

marry money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying money. I think it's quite sad that people would rather marry money than find someone they truly love.
See also: marry, money

marry to

1. To join someone to another person in marriage. A noun or pronoun is used between "marry" and "to"; often used in passive constructions. I've been married to my husband for nearly 30 years. My parents wanted to marry me to the son of a wealthy business man, but I refused. It would be my honor to marry you to Charles.
2. To instill a belief or adherence to a particular belief or idea in someone. A noun or pronoun is used between "marry" and "to"; often used in passive constructions. You'll need to marry our investors to your plan if you want the funding to execute it. I wasn't married to the idea at first, but the more they explained it to me, the more convinced I became.
See also: marry

marry into (something)

To join, become a part of, or come into possession of something through marriage. There are still a cynical few who believe she is only with him so she can marry into money. Because of his father-in-law's connections, Jake has in effect married into one of the most powerful social clubs in the country.
See also: marry

marry off

To set up one's child, especially a daughter, to be married to someone else so as to no longer be financially responsible for them. A noun or pronoun is used either before or after "off." Despite social advancements in the country, there is still a culture of marrying off one's daughters at the earliest possible time to someone of great wealth or status. I wish you would stop trying to marry me off whenever we're at a large gathering of people—I'll get married if and when I'm ready, thank you very much.
See also: marry, off

marry up

1. To marry someone who is more attractive, intelligent, capable, of a higher social class or standing, etc., compared to oneself. He always jokes when he's out with his wife that he married up. Don't say you married up—that implies that I just settled for someone who isn't as good as me.
2. To join, combine, or integrate two different things or elements together in a way that is mutually beneficial. We're marrying up traditional techniques with bleeding-edge technologies to deliver a range of products that are both modern and timeless. This merger will marry up the strengths of both our companies, providing an even better experience to our customers.
See also: marry, up

marry (one's) way out of (something)

To escape some state or condition by marrying someone with the appropriate means or resources. She says she married for love, but I'm still convinced she just married her way out of bankruptcy. You aren't in love with her—you're just marrying your way out of loneliness!
See also: marry, of, out, way

marry above oneself

Fig. to marry someone in a higher social class than oneself. They say she married above herself, but who cares? Scott thought it would not be possible to marry above himself.
See also: above, marry

marry below oneself

 and marry beneath oneself
Fig. to marry someone in a lower social class than oneself. He married beneath himself, but he is happy, and what more is required of a marriage? He did not want to marry beneath himself.
See also: below, marry

Marry in haste, (and) repent at leisure.

Prov. If you marry someone you do not know well, or decide to marry someone without first carefully considering what you are doing, you will probably regret it for a long time. Sally wanted some time to consider Sam's proposal of marriage; she had heard the saying, "Marry in haste, and repent at leisure."
See also: leisure, marry

marry into something

to become a part of a family or a fortune by marriage. She married into money, they say. I always wanted to marry into a large family until I found out what that means in terms of buying gifts.
See also: marry

marry one's way out of something

to get out of something, such as poverty, by marrying someone. She was able to marry her way out of poverty but regretted it in the long run. Sally married her way out of one unhappy home into another one.
See also: marry, of, out, way

marry someone off (to someone)

to manage to get someone married to someone and out of the house or family. Her parents wanted nothing more than to marry her off to a doctor. They married off their children soon.
See also: marry, off

marry up (with someone)

Rur. to marry someone. They married up in the spring. Jane's going to marry up with someone she met at school.
See also: marry, up

marry money

marry a rich person. informal
See also: marry, money

marry in ˈhaste (, repent at ˈleisure)

(saying) people who marry quickly, without really getting to know each other, will discover later that they have made a mistake
See also: haste, marry

marry ˈmoney

marry a rich person: His sister married money — she lives in Bermuda now.
See also: marry, money
References in periodicals archive ?
No wonder Madhuri Dixit Nene chose to marry an Indian doctor in the US who, too, had not seen any of her films.
For the record, it is Chairman PTI Imran Khan's personal business and no one else's, when, with whom and where he decides to marry.
"Those who wait longer are more likely to have lasting unions when--and if--they do marry. For those parents who divorced, it is kind of nice to think that your offspring may avoid the same problems by taking longer to find a partner."
The survey also reveals that 59.8 percent of Turkish people would not marry a non-Muslim even if they were to fall in love with a non-Muslim, while 40.2 percent say they would get married with a non-Muslim if they were to fall in love.
He then went and told Dubai Police about their affair so that her parents would be forced to let the pair marry so they avoided prosecution.
The Ministry of Interior source also informed that many Omanis continue to marry foreign nationals without informing the authorities.
Or how about if Sondra Locke married Elliott Ness, then divorced him to marry Herman Munster?
They suggest addressing the problem of underage marriage and its association with poor fertility control by expanding "family planning programs tailored to married adolescents," and ensuring that interventions target men who might marry adolescents, women already in early marriages, and the husbands and in-laws of women who married as adolescents.
Bishop Malcolm McMahon states his belief that priests should be allowed to marry and then contradicts that statement in the second paragraph by saying, "But they must be married before they are ordained." That's not allowing priests to marry, it's ordaining married men.
It seems shocking these days for couples to marry so young, and indeed last year only 4,000 teenage girls married, compared with 112,000 in 1970.
Girls who marry young tend to be from poor families and to have low levels of education.
Tertullian, the eminent third-century patristic, followed Paul's understanding of gunai when he stated, "The apostles too were allowed to marry and take their wives with them." But later he became more ascetic and reinterpreted New Testament verses according to his bias.
LORD of the Dance Michael Flatley has been given the go-ahead for a church wedding to marry Niamh O'Brien - after the Catholic Church agreed not to recognise his first marriage.
Despite this, young people continue to wish to marry, and approximately fifty percent of them will do so successfully.