married


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Related to married: Married Filing Separately

marry the gunner's daughter

obsolete naval Of a seaman, to be bound to a cannon or other such armament and flogged or lashed as corporal punishment. The first mate ended up marrying the gunner's daughter for attempting to bring about a mutiny on the ship.
See also: daughter, marry

marry beneath (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath herself with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry

marry above (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above her station, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above one's station.
See also: above, marry, station

marry into money

To become wealthy or financially secure by marrying someone who is wealthy or has a wealthy family. Ever since he married into money, George has been flaunting all of the exotic vacations he and his new wife take. During college, when I had barely enough money to eat each day, I vowed that someday I'd marry into money and start living a much more comfortable life.
See also: marry, money

marry (someone) for (his or her) money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying Donald for his money. I think it's quite sad that people would marry for money rather than true love of their spouse.
See also: marry, money

marry above (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above herself, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above oneself.
See also: above, marry

marry below (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below her station with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry, station

marry below (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below herself with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry

marry beneath (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath her station with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry, station

marry money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying money. I think it's quite sad that people would rather marry money than find someone they truly love.
See also: marry, money

marry to

1. To join someone to another person in marriage. A noun or pronoun is used between "marry" and "to"; often used in passive constructions. I've been married to my husband for nearly 30 years. My parents wanted to marry me to the son of a wealthy business man, but I refused. It would be my honor to marry you to Charles.
2. To instill a belief or adherence to a particular belief or idea in someone. A noun or pronoun is used between "marry" and "to"; often used in passive constructions. You'll need to marry our investors to your plan if you want the funding to execute it. I wasn't married to the idea at first, but the more they explained it to me, the more convinced I became.
See also: marry

marry into (something)

To join, become a part of, or come into possession of something through marriage. There are still a cynical few who believe she is only with him so she can marry into money. Because of his father-in-law's connections, Jake has in effect married into one of the most powerful social clubs in the country.
See also: marry

marry off

To set up one's child, especially a daughter, to be married to someone else so as to no longer be financially responsible for them. A noun or pronoun is used either before or after "off." Despite social advancements in the country, there is still a culture of marrying off one's daughters at the earliest possible time to someone of great wealth or status. I wish you would stop trying to marry me off whenever we're at a large gathering of people—I'll get married if and when I'm ready, thank you very much.
See also: marry, off

marry up

1. To marry someone who is more attractive, intelligent, capable, of a higher social class or standing, etc., compared to oneself. He always jokes when he's out with his wife that he married up. Don't say you married up—that implies that I just settled for someone who isn't as good as me.
2. To join, combine, or integrate two different things or elements together in a way that is mutually beneficial. We're marrying up traditional techniques with bleeding-edge technologies to deliver a range of products that are both modern and timeless. This merger will marry up the strengths of both our companies, providing an even better experience to our customers.
See also: marry, up

marry (one's) way out of (something)

To escape some state or condition by marrying someone with the appropriate means or resources. She says she married for love, but I'm still convinced she just married her way out of bankruptcy. You aren't in love with her—you're just marrying your way out of loneliness!
See also: marry, of, out, way

get married

To participate in a marriage ceremony and become someone's (or one another's) spouse; to wed. We got married in a cute little church in my hometown. You two have been together forever—when are you going to get married?
See also: get, married

get married

to become united as husband and wife. Bill and Sally got married when they were in college. We got married in Texas just after we graduated from college.
See also: get, married

have to get married

Euph. [for a couple] to get married because the woman is pregnant. They didn't have a long engagement. They had to get married, you see. They had to get married, and their first baby was born seven months later.
See also: get, have, married

marry someone off (to someone)

to manage to get someone married to someone and out of the house or family. Her parents wanted nothing more than to marry her off to a doctor. They married off their children soon.
See also: marry, off

marry up (with someone)

Rur. to marry someone. They married up in the spring. Jane's going to marry up with someone she met at school.
See also: marry, up

marry money

marry a rich person. informal
See also: marry, money

marry ˈmoney

marry a rich person: His sister married money — she lives in Bermuda now.
See also: marry, money
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirty-five percent of Jewish women were married by age 21, compared to 59% of Arab women.
These two got together on "Married at First Sight" Season 1, and they were an unlikely pair.
For tax year 2019, the top rate is 37 percent for individual single taxpayers with incomes greater than $510,300 ($612,350 for married couples filing jointly).
And lately, I seem to mostly attract married men - they hit on me and when I decide they are interesting enough to give my time, I find out they are married.
Help me trace my forgotten family I AM trying to find descendants of Richard Gore who married Elizabeth Parrish in 1870 at St Peter's Church in Birmingham.
Zinta finally married an American who had nothing to do with the film industry and had not seen a single film of hers.
Ever-married women are women who have been married at least once in their lives although their current marital status may not be married.
MEN and women are now getting married eight years older than they would have done 50 years ago.
Meanwhile, the average age of people in same-sex relationships 88 per live they getting married is significantly greater than those in heterosexual relationships.
"We have arrested a woman who was impersonating a man and married two women.
Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) leader Shireen Mazari on Saturday denounced a report that the party chairman Imran Khan was married for the third time.
I'm engaged to get married to my long-term partner, but I'm having an affair with my ex-boyfriend.
Sons and daughters of mothers who tied the knot young are more likely to want to marry early, too, but only if mom stayed married, says a study in the Journal of Family Psychology.
They had seven children who all married at St Catherine's Church, Nechells, between 1895 and 1907.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- A recent survey conducted and released by the Gezici Research Company on the eve of Valentine's Day has shown that 49.6 percent of divorced Turks say they married for love, while 18.7 say their marriage had been arranged.