married


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Related to married: Married Filing Separately
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marry the gunner's daughter

obsolete naval Of a seaman, to be bound to a cannon or other such armament and flogged or lashed as corporal punishment. The first mate ended up marrying the gunner's daughter for attempting to bring about a mutiny on the ship.
See also: daughter, marry

marry beneath (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath herself with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry

marry above (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above her station, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above one's station.
See also: above, marry, station

marry into money

To become wealthy or financially secure by marrying someone who is wealthy or has a wealthy family. Ever since he married into money, George has been flaunting all of the exotic vacations he and his new wife take. During college, when I had barely enough money to eat each day, I vowed that someday I'd marry into money and start living a much more comfortable life.
See also: marry, money

marry (someone) for (his or her) money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying Donald for his money. I think it's quite sad that people would marry for money rather than true love of their spouse.
See also: marry, money

marry above (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above herself, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above oneself.
See also: above, marry

marry below (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below her station with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry, station

marry below (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below herself with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry

marry beneath (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath her station with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry, station

marry money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying money. I think it's quite sad that people would rather marry money than find someone they truly love.
See also: marry, money

marry to

1. To join someone to another person in marriage. A noun or pronoun is used between "marry" and "to"; often used in passive constructions. I've been married to my husband for nearly 30 years. My parents wanted to marry me to the son of a wealthy business man, but I refused. It would be my honor to marry you to Charles.
2. To instill a belief or adherence to a particular belief or idea in someone. A noun or pronoun is used between "marry" and "to"; often used in passive constructions. You'll need to marry our investors to your plan if you want the funding to execute it. I wasn't married to the idea at first, but the more they explained it to me, the more convinced I became.
See also: marry

marry into (something)

To join, become a part of, or come into possession of something through marriage. There are still a cynical few who believe she is only with him so she can marry into money. Because of his father-in-law's connections, Jake has in effect married into one of the most powerful social clubs in the country.
See also: marry

marry off

To set up one's child, especially a daughter, to be married to someone else so as to no longer be financially responsible for them. A noun or pronoun is used either before or after "off." Despite social advancements in the country, there is still a culture of marrying off one's daughters at the earliest possible time to someone of great wealth or status. I wish you would stop trying to marry me off whenever we're at a large gathering of people—I'll get married if and when I'm ready, thank you very much.
See also: marry, off

marry up

1. To marry someone who is more attractive, intelligent, capable, of a higher social class or standing, etc., compared to oneself. He always jokes when he's out with his wife that he married up. Don't say you married up—that implies that I just settled for someone who isn't as good as me.
2. To join, combine, or integrate two different things or elements together in a way that is mutually beneficial. We're marrying up traditional techniques with bleeding-edge technologies to deliver a range of products that are both modern and timeless. This merger will marry up the strengths of both our companies, providing an even better experience to our customers.
See also: marry, up

marry (one's) way out of

To escape some state or condition by marrying someone with the appropriate means or resources. She says she married for love, but I'm still convinced she just married her way out of bankruptcy. You aren't in love with her—you're just marrying your way out of loneliness!
See also: marry, of, out, way

get married

to become united as husband and wife. Bill and Sally got married when they were in college. We got married in Texas just after we graduated from college.
See also: get, married

have to get married

Euph. [for a couple] to get married because the woman is pregnant. They didn't have a long engagement. They had to get married, you see. They had to get married, and their first baby was born seven months later.
See also: get, have, married

marry someone off (to someone)

to manage to get someone married to someone and out of the house or family. Her parents wanted nothing more than to marry her off to a doctor. They married off their children soon.
See also: marry, off

marry up (with someone)

Rur. to marry someone. They married up in the spring. Jane's going to marry up with someone she met at school.
See also: marry, up

marry money

marry a rich person. informal
See also: marry, money

marry ˈmoney

marry a rich person: His sister married money — she lives in Bermuda now.
See also: marry, money
References in periodicals archive ?
Yes, it's a big thing to say you don't want to get married any more because you're not only breaking his heart, you're potentially upsetting a lot of other people too.
When asked questions about financial decision-making, married individuals overvalue their own contribution, undervalue their spouse's contribution or do both, the report reveals.
Sulaiman, a government employee working at the Education Department in the Northern Border Province, married his first wife from his neighborhood when he was 16.
The winner of the joust gets to name which of the daughters he wants to marry and if she is available they will be married the next day.
Omanis who are already married to foreign nationals need to apply to the Ministry of Interior and are then referred to the office of the public prosecutor.
If Dolly Parton married Salvador Dali, she'd be Dolly Dali; if Olivia Newton-John married Wayne Newton, then divorced him to marry Elton John, she'd be Olivia Newton-John Newton John.
The research, which appears in the forthcoming issue of the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, reports that adults over 40 who have never married are just as psychologically resourceful as adults who marry.
Some 45% of all respondents had married before age 18, 23% before age 16 and 3% before age 13.
The survey revealed that married, middle-aged people are half as likely to get dementia as their single counterparts, while getting divorced, or becoming widowed, raises the risk three-fold.
To ordain a married man is to raise him to a higher vocation, whereas to allow a priest to marry is to demote him to a lesser one.
The proportion married is lower at older ages--38% of women age 75-84 and 16% of women age 88 and over were married.
It seems shocking these days for couples to marry so young, and indeed last year only 4,000 teenage girls married, compared with 112,000 in 1970.
Common wisdom suggests that married priests would be a quick fix to the "vocation crisis," and many have argued persuasively for a change.
Veautour of Westminster, married in New Hampshire June 9, 1996.
With [approximately equal to]25,000 girls <18 years being married each day, an estimated 100 million will be married by 2012 (1).