marked

(redirected from markedness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

marked man

A person who is targeted for harm or retaliation of some kind. After Ed alerted the authorities about the corruption that took place within the company, he became a marked man.
See also: man, marked

mark down

1. verb To record or make a note of something, typically by making a mark of some kind with a writing utensil or digitally. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mark" and "down." Did you mark down my score for that last round? Sure, mark me down for a $20 donation.
2. verb To reduce the price of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mark" and "down." Would you be willing to mark it down a little? I'm trying to stick to a budget. Those bananas have all been marked down because they're starting to turn brown.
3. verb To subtract points from an overall score due to an incorrect answer, poor performance, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mark" and "down." The gymnast is definitely going to see her score marked down for several small infractions. I would have had a perfect score, but the teacher marked it down for a few spelling mistakes.
4. noun A discount, or a discounted item. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated or written as one word. I always go to the sale rack in the back to take a look at the markdowns. Do they ever offer any mark-downs, or are their prices always the same?
See also: down, mark

mark time

To idly wait; to do nothing except observe the passage of time. I wish we had something to do, but we just have to mark time until this thing is published and we get some reviews.
See also: mark, time

mark up

1. To make markings on something, often in a way that defaces it. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mark" and "up." It looks like a child got their hands on these legal documents and marked them up with crayon. We'll have to reprint them. Unfortunately my new white shoes got marked up when I wore them on that walk that turned into a hike.
2. To write on or make informative markings on a document. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mark" and "up." I like to mark up my students' papers with a lot of comments in the margin so that they know why they received the grade they did. Please go through the document and mark it up with any suggestions you have.
3. To increase the price of something, especially in the process of setting the initial price, as a way to ensure that a profit is made from its sale. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "mark" and "up." Movie theaters mark up the price of popcorn and candy really high because those are their main money-makers. I expect the store to mark the price up after the holiday sale, so we might as well buy it now.
See also: mark, up

mark (something) with a white stone

obsolete To consider or indicate that something is very favorable, fortunate, or pleasurable. Usually used in passive constructions. Those are days that shall forever be marked with a white stone in my mind.
See also: mark, stone, white

mark (someone or something) off

1. To put a mark of some kind by a name or thing on a list as an indication of something (e.g., completion of a task, attendance of something, etc.). Please mark off each item on the list if you see it in the warehouse. I'll mark you off when I am satisfied you've done the assignment as I requested.
2. To lower the score or grade of someone or something. The professor marked me off because I didn't show all of my work. While we really like the internal specs of the phone, we have to mark it off because of the cheap-feeling plastic they used in its body.
See also: mark, off

mark (something) out

To draw, establish, or otherwise indicate the boundary of some region or area. We went through with the architect and marked out exactly where our property ended and the neighbors' property began. Please mark out the area you intend to excavate.
See also: mark, out

mark someone down

[for a teacher] to give someone a low score. He'll mark you down for misspelled words. I marked down Tom for bad spelling.
See also: down, mark

mark something down

 
1. Lit. to write something down on paper. She marked the number down on the paper. She marked down the number.
2. Fig. to reduce the price of something. We are going to mark all this merchandise down next Monday. We marked down the merchandise.
See also: down, mark

mark something up

 
1. to mess something up with marks. Don't mark up your book! Who marked this book up?
2. to grade a paper and make lots of informative marks and comments on it. The teacher really marked up my term paper. Why did you mark my test up so much? I hardly made any errors.
3. to raise the price of something. The grocery store seems to mark the price of food up every week. They don't mark up the price of turkey at Thanks giving.
See also: mark, up

mark time

Fig. to wait; to do nothing but wait. I'll just mark time till things get better. Do you expect me to just stand here and mark time?
See also: mark, time

*marked man

Fig. to be someone, usually a male, who is in danger from harm by someone else. (*Typically: be ~; live like ~.) Bob's a marked man. His parents found out that he's skipping school. Fred's a marked man, too. Jack is looking for him to get his money back.
See also: man, marked

mark down

Reduce the price of something, as in If they mark down these shoes, I'll buy two pairs. The mark here alludes to the label indicating a price. [Mid-1800s]
See also: down, mark

marked man, a

Also, marked woman. A person singled out as an object of suspicion, hostility, or vengeance. For example, As a witness to the robbery, he felt he was a marked man, or After her fiasco at the meeting, she was a marked woman-no one would hire her. This idiom was first recorded in 1833.
See also: marked

mark time

Wait idly for something to occur, as in We were just marking time until we received our instructions. This idiom alludes to the literal meaning of marching in place to the time, or beat, of music. [Early 1800s]
See also: mark, time

mark up

1. Deface by drawing, cutting, or another means of covering something with marks. For example, John was punished for marking up his desk, or These shoes really mark up the floor.
2. Raise the price of something, as in This small shop marks up its merchandise much more than department stores do. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: mark, up

mark time

COMMON If you mark time, you do not do anything interesting or of value, because you are waiting to see how a situation develops. He had failed his college exams and was marking time working in a baker's shop. People think that I'm marking time till I can make movies or Broadway shows. Note: When soldiers mark time, they march on the spot without moving forward.
See also: mark, time

mark time

1 (of troops) march on the spot without moving forward. 2 pass your time in routine activities until a more interesting opportunity presents itself.
See also: mark, time

mark ˈtime

stay in one situation, job, etc., not making any progress, but waiting for an opportunity to do so: ‘What are you doing at the moment?’ ‘I’m just marking time until somebody offers me a better job.’
If soldiers mark time, they march on one spot without moving forward.
See also: mark, time

a marked ˈman

a man who is in danger of being killed by his enemies: When they discovered he was a spy, he became a marked man.
See also: man, marked

mark down

v.
1. To write a description or symbol for something observed; make a note of something: I marked down the characteristics of every bird I saw in the woods. Did you mark the directions down?
2. To lower the price of something offered for sale: The department store marked down all of its shoes last week by 20 percent. The baker marks the bread down an hour before closing.
See also: down, mark

mark up

v.
1. To cover something with marks, especially defacing it: The rubber balls the kids threw in the hallway marked up the walls. The broken vacuum cleaner marked the floors up.
2. To write comments or corrections directly on some document: The teacher had marked up everyone's papers before passing them back to us. The committee marked the report up with comments and questions.
3. To raise the price of something put on sale: You'd better buy the shoes now before they mark them up. The new owners marked up the entire inventory.
See also: mark, up

mark time

tv. to wait; to do nothing but wait. Do you expect me to just stand here and mark time?
See also: mark, time

mark time

1. To move the feet alternately in the rhythm of a marching step without advancing.
2. To suspend progress for the time being; wait in readiness.
3. To function in an apathetic or ineffective manner.
See also: mark, time
References in periodicals archive ?
phonological markedness constraints should be phonetically grounded in some property of articulation or perception.
She adds that because markedness in language originates from speech communities outside of the classroom, primary efforts for change must be made in those communities where it is rooted in.
However, asymmetries in goal and benefactive verbs (also reported by Oh (2010)) indicate that higher accuracy in PPCs could not be explained by markedness.
Markedness and topic continuity in discourse processing.
As already mentioned, Croft's model is centred around the notion of morpho-syntactic markedness.
In Antonio Bertacca's "The Language of Charles Darwin's Red Notebook" (8399) linguistic markedness, or rather 'markedness reversal', owes to the 'self-oriented', 'intrapersonal' character of the notebook, in which "full expression would have been unsuitable" (p.
Among the topics are sonority and sonority-based relationships within American English monosyllabic words, whether the sonority sequencing principle is an epiphenomenon, sonority variation in stochastic optimality theory and its implications for markedness hierarchies, sonority and the larynx, the sonority dispersion principle in the acquisition of Hebrew word final codas, and acceleration peaks and sonority in Finnish sign language syllables.
The experience of "humor" as a cooperative construction between the narrator/sender and the receiver/reader based on pragmatic presuppositions, implicatures, cognitive informativeness, and markedness underlies Ermida's hybrid model entitled "Hypothesis.
But here it begins to get the fuller comparative and deeper regional treatment it deserves from seasoned field researchers with strong ethnographic and linguistic understanding of the pragmatics of markedness.
Building on Blom and Gumperz's (1972) notion of ' situational' code-switching, two models have developed which focus on the setting of interactions and socio-psychological features that pertain to it: Giles's Speech Accommodation Theory (Giles, Bourhis & Taylor 1977), later known as Communication Accommodation Theory (Giles, Coupland & Coupland 1991) and Myers-Scotton's Markedness Model (1993), later extended as the Rational Choice Model (2001).
Cintron (1997) studied code- switching in Nuyorican and Chicano poetry from the perspective of Myers-Scotton's markedness model in an attempt to connect poetics, stylistics, and linguistics.
Davison, Alice (1984), "Syntactic markedness and the definition of sentence topic", en Language, vol.
One of the more complete theories of code switching within sociolinguistics is the Markedness Model, developed by Carol Myers- Scotten (1993).