mark (someone or something) with (something)

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mark (someone or something) with (something)

1. To make one or more marks on someone or something with a particular material. I've marked all your papers with red ink so that you can see my corrections clearly. The priest marked the celebrants with ash on their foreheads.
2. To place a specific number, letter, or other symbol on someone or something to indicate a particular meaning. The bouncer marked everyone's hands with a large X if they were underage. Mark the crates with a 1 if they are being delivered to Texas, and mark them with a 2 if they are being delivered to New York.
See also: mark

mark someone or something with something

 
1. to use something with which to mark someone or something. She marked one of the twins with a sticker so she could identify him later. Jill marked the ones that were sold with a wax pencil.
2. to place a particular kind of mark on someone or something. The attendant marked the concertgoers who had paid with a rubber stamp. Frank marked the book with his initials.
See also: mark
References in periodicals archive ?
The 355 nm wavelength further increases the range of plastics that can be marked with contrast, and also offers the ultimate control of heat input when marking metals.
Calendered stock, tread extrusions, plies, beads and finished fires have been marked with tags, offset printers, indenting wheels, paint, acetate labels, hand stamps, even house paints.
Most uncured extrusions are still marked with a 24" (circumference) contact printing wheel that applies pigmented ink.
"Child of God, you have been sealed by the Holy Spirit and marked with the cross of Christ forever." (10)
Her final cross has passed, and mine is yet to come, but its mark bridges the gap that separates us, and its power will one day reunite my grandma and me, along with all who are marked with the sign of faith.
After the investigators marked with temporary ink on various parts of the dolphin's bodies, the animals began perusing the marks by positioning themselves in front of mirrors in their enclosure.
She is no longer Cain, the exile, but is both Set, crucified by the tree on her back,(9) and Seth, the son who carries on the line of Adam and Eve and who foreshadows Christ.(10) The tree marks her as one of out of Eden, yet the tree also connects her to her mother, marked with a cross, and the group of African slaves who were all marked in that way.
In their study, Alatalo and Mappes examined the responses of 16 birds called great tits (Parus major) to artificial prey, both palatable and unpalatable, that the scientists had marked with novel symbols.
To each stalk they attached a piece of paper marked with a symbol.