mark you

mark you

A phrase used to indicate that someone must consider or pay attention to a particular piece of information. Primarily heard in UK. They are expensive, mark you, but the quality of their craftsmanship is worth the extra price. Mark you, they can certainly afford to give some of their profits back to their employees.
See also: mark

ˌmark ˈyou

(old-fashioned, spoken, especially British English) used to remind somebody of something they should consider in a particular case: She hasn’t had much success yet. Mark you, she tries hard.
See also: mark
References in periodicals archive ?
Even when Twombly is not actually "dedicating" a work, when he is instead only idly doodling a name on his canvas--Leda, Mars, Bolsena--he is operating within the field of the performative: I mark you, I name you, I call you "painting." This is the big difference, the difference amounting to an absolute rupture of discursive intent, between the notion of the performative and that of analogy.
First, it is performative, suspending representation in favor of action: I mark you, I cance you, I dirty you.