map

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Related to mapped: MAPED, mapped out

all over the map

1. Spread out or scattered over a great distance. I love how people from all over the map make their way to this bar for a drink.
2. In or having a great number and variety. Public opinion is all over the map for the governor, so it's hard to know how she'll do in the next election.
3. Unorganized or scattered in thinking, communication, or planning. I tried to get a sense of John's plan for the project, but he seems all over the map with it.
See also: all, map, over

blow off the map

To obliterate. A noun or pronoun can be used between "blow" and "off." Many buildings were blown off the map during the siege. The dictator threatened to blow our country off the map.
See also: blow, map, off

fall off the map

To become unpopular or little-known after a period of popularity. Wow, I didn't realize that this show was still on TV—it really fell off the map after its first season.
See also: fall, map, off

map out

To carefully plan or provide the details or something, especially by rendering it in some way, as by illustrating or outlining it. The committee mapped out the five-year plan with an extensive slideshow showing all the projected improvements. Look, I've mapped out our road trip in red marker so you can get a sense of the route we'll be taking.
See also: map, out

off the map

In a distant, remote, or obscure state or location. The cabin is a bit off the map, but the scenery around it is beautiful. I liked the show, but it must have fallen off the map after its first season, because no one talks about it anymore.
See also: map, off

put (someone, something, or some place) on the map

To make some place or thing very famous or renowned; to establish some place as being remarkable or noteworthy. It was my grandma's chili recipe that put this restaurant on the map years ago! They're hoping that this amusement park can put the small town on the map. Her first film put her on the map. Her next three movies made her a legend.
See also: map, on, put

the map is not the territory

A person or thing is completely separate from the judgments or perceptions that people place upon it. The phrase was coined by US semanticist Alfred Korzybski. I know you dislike Ed because of how he acted in that meeting, but you don't actually know him. Just keep in mind that the map is not the territory, OK?
See also: map, not, territory

throw a map

obsolete slang To vomit. The poor man must have eaten something that didn't agree with him, because he's in the lavatory throwing a map.
See also: map, throw

wipe (someone or something) off the map

To totally eliminate, eradicate, or destroy someone or something. The president vowed to wipe these terrorist scumbags off the map. Through our vaccination efforts, we've been able to wipe polio off the map.
See also: map, off, wipe

wipe (something) off the map

To obliterate something. The dictator threatened to wipe our country off the map. They believe that the course of treatment they've developed could wipe cancer off the map. Many buildings were wiped off the map during the siege.
See also: map, off, wipe

map something out

to plot something out carefully, usually on paper. I have a good plan. I will map it out for you. I will map out the plan for you.
See also: map, out

put something on the map

Fig. to make some place famous or popular. The good food you serve here will really put this place on the map. Nothing like a little scandal to put an otherwise sleepy town on the map.
See also: map, on, put

put on the map

Make famous, publicize, as in The incident got on the national news and put our community on the map. This expression, alluding to a locality that formerly was too small to put on a map, dates from the early 1900s.
See also: map, on, put

wipe off the map

Also, wipe off the face of the earth. Eliminate completely, as in Some day we hope to wipe malaria off the map. This idiom uses wipe in the sense of "obliterate," and map and face of the earth in the sense of "everywhere."
See also: map, off, wipe

put someone/something on the map

COMMON If someone or something puts a person, place, or thing on the map, they cause them to become well-known or important. The film which really put Ellen Barkin on the map was The Big Easy. In today's programme, we look at the career of the man who, in 13 years as Chancellor, put Austria back on the map.
See also: map, on, put, someone, something

off the map

(of a place) very distant or remote. Compare with off the beaten track (at beaten).
See also: map, off

put something on the map

make something prominent or important.
See also: map, on, put, something

wipe something off the map

obliterate something totally.
See also: map, off, something, wipe

(be) off the ˈmap

(be) far away from other places; (be) remote: It’s a little house in the country, a bit off the map.
See also: map, off

put somebody/something on the ˈmap

make somebody/something famous or important: Her performance in her first film really put her on the map.The newspaper story put the village on the map.
See also: map, on, put, somebody, something

map out

v.
1. To plan something explicitly: Let's map out a way to accomplish this project. We mapped the trip out so we wouldn't get lost.
2. To incorporate or lay out some set of things into an explicit map, plan, or order: I've mapped out the beginning and end of each project on this timeline. The houses on these city blocks have been mapped out for demolition.
See also: map, out

map

1. n. one’s face. With a map like that, she could really go somewhere.
2. n. sheet music. (see also chart.) I left the map at home. Can I look at yours?

throw a map

tv. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. Somebody threw a map on the sidewalk.
See also: map, throw

all over the map

1. In, from, or to a variety of places; ubiquitously.
2. Showing great variety; varied or diverse: "Literary nonfiction is all over the map and has been for three hundred years" (William Zinsser).
See also: all, map, over

put on the map

To make well-known, prominent, or famous.
See also: map, on, put

wipe off the map

To destroy completely; annihilate.
See also: map, off, wipe
References in periodicals archive ?
One hundred percent of the newly mapped DNA markers were assigned to one of 17 linkage groups on the reference SSR map (Tang et al., 2002).
Of the SSR marker loci mapped in HA370 x HA372, 96 had been mapped in PHA x PHB, RHA280 x RHA801, or both and were selected to supply a strategically positioned framework of common SSR markers for integrating the RFLP maps of Berry et al.
The SCAR marker SCT06151 (Lawson et al., 1998) mapped to LG8 in both mapping populations close to a cluster of NBS-LRR resistance gene candidates (e.g., RGC1A) and the [Pl.sub.1] gene for resistance to downy mildew [Plasmopara halstedii (Farl.) Berlese et de Toni] race 1 (Gedil et al., 2001a).
Several SSR markers mapped distal to ZVG1-1, the upper terminal RFLP marker on map A.
Several SSR marker loci mapped distal to ZVG5-2, the upper terminal RFLP marker on LG2 (map A).
The only SSR marker that mapped distal to ORS488 and ORS525 on the lower ends of maps B, C, and D was ORS13 on map B.
ORS1120 mapped distal to ZVG24-5, the lower terminal RFLP marker on map A.
On the basis of the position of ZVG29-7 on maps A and B and ORS618 on maps B and D, we concluded that several SSR marker loci (e.g., ORS400 and ORS928) mapped distal to ZVG29-7, the upper terminal RFLP marker locus on the reference RFLP map.
Several SSR markers (e.g., ORS1265 and ORS805) on LG9 mapped distal to ZVG38-9, the upper terminal RFLP marker locus on the reference RFLP map.
SSR marker loci mapped close to the terminal RFLP markers ZVG43-10 and ZVG48-10 and were dispersed throughout the chromosome.
Several SSR marker loci (e.g., ORS621 and ORS114711) mapped distal to the terminal RFLP marker loci on the reference map (ZVG49-11 and ZVG53-11).
ORS200 and ORS799 on LG13 mapped distal or close to the two terminal RFLP markers (ZVG58-13 and ZVG61-13) on map B.
The spectrometer showed the planet's UV brightness at such low resolution that Herbert admits "maybe either this reconstruction is wrong, or the magnetic-field model needs adjustment." Sandel adds that the study is still not finished, and stresses that the precise locations of the mapped auroras "could change somewhat" as he and Herbert refine their analytical techniques.
But the vast size of the newly mapped voids doesn't match the calculated distribution of cold dark matter, they report.
Total cost of the project will also hinge on the total number of human genomes mapped, says Paul Berg, Stanford biochemist and Nobel laureate: "Whose DNA are we going to sequence?