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man

1. informal A term of address for another person, especially a friend or acquaintance. Usually but not solely used in reference to a male. Hey, man, good to see you!
2. interjection, informal Used to express an intense emotional reaction, whether good or bad. Man, the first Indiana Jones is such a great movie! I just heard about the layoffs at your company! Man, what a bummer.

the man

1. slang The established order or body of authority, especially the government. Primarily heard in US. I've been getting small tax refunds by mistake for years, but I've never said anything to them about it. It's my own little way of sticking it to the man. Of course you don't understand—you work for the man now. You're just a cog in the whole corrupt machine, dude.
2. slang The police as an entity. Primarily heard in US. In this town, you're more likely to get shot by the man than any criminal on the streets.
See also: man
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

man

1. n. one’s friend; a buddy, not necessarily male. (Also a term of address.) Look, man, take it easy!
2. exclam. Wow! (Usually Man!) Man, what a bundle!
3. and the man n. a drug seller or pusher. (Drugs.) The man won’t give you credit, you numskull!
4. and the man n. a police officer; the police; the establishment. You better check with the man before you get seen with me.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Manning's co-author, Underwood, said it's unfair to harp on decades-old events to suggest Manning is racially insensitive.
I told Underwood I wasn't arguing that Manning is racist.
Archie Manning, for example, recalls integration in Drew this way:
But integration in Manning's hometown did not come as peacefully as Manning recalls.
By early 1965, after years of struggle, just 155 blacks were registered to vote in Sunflower, Manning's home county:--1.1 percent of eligible black adults.
As I paged back and forth between Manning and Silver Rights, I was struck by sadness.
Archie Manning was a small-town kid who graduated first in his class by sheer hard work, endured his father's suicide, suffered through injuries and defeats to become a football legend, then passed his work ethic on to his children.
Before they died, the parents saw seven of their children graduate from Archie Manning's alma mater, the University of Mississippi.
Archie Manning writes that "even the most avowed integrationist would agree that you can't always get from A to Z right now.