manners maketh man

manners maketh man

A good man has a strong sense of morality. This phrase is typically attributed to 14th-century bishop William of Wykeham. To hear that so many of our students intervened to stop this crime restores my faith in the youth of the world. Manners maketh man, you know.
See also: maketh, man, manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Harry Hart from the film 'Kingsman' said that 'manners maketh man,' but I'm sure he'd also agree with me that it's better to just have good manners because they cost nothing, and defamation lawsuits cost a fortune.
THEY SAY "Texting is now the only vehicle for covert flirting and if phone manners maketh man, or indeed woman, I am all for it" - interior designer Nicky Haslam.
"Texting is now the only vehicle for covert flirting, and if phone manners maketh man, or indeed woman, I am all for it" - interior designer Nicky Haslam.
When yuh go, knock at de side, say good morning, 'manners maketh man,' an' tell the shopkeeper fuh sen' a pound of salt fish, a penny in butter, ten biscuits, de hard ones, ones fuh cooking, an' a tin of sardines.
Manners maketh man and good language use maketh great men and even greater women!
It used to be said that manners maketh man and it still should.
IN the 14th century, an erudite gentleman by the name of William Of Wykeham coined the proverb 'Manners maketh man'.
In Renaissance England, "Manners maketh man" was a commonplace motto, Anna Bryson argues, "neither anachronistic nor ridiculous" (3).
Manners maketh man, we are told, but unquestionably a decent suit of clothes would also smooth the rough edges of savagery.
As thank-you letters grow ever rarer, top restaurants are no longer defined by their exclusivity and even the practice of holding a door open is anything but universal, Llandovery College said it wants to drive home the message that manners maketh man or woman.
I know I keep saying it, but 'manners maketh man' and that begins at home with parents.
MANNERS maketh man, so the saying goes, and it's certainly true for this bunch of polite youngsters who have graduated with honours from Birmingham's school of etiquette.
"Manners maketh man as much as ever, especially in the pounds 50,000-plus bracket where the number of jobs has fallen by between a third and a half, hidden by the fact that high earners refuse to register unemployed."
We learned a great many things there." Audrey particularly remembers the "very strict" headmistress Kathleen Evans, who taught the children that "manners maketh man".