manner


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company manners

Exceptional manners; those that are preferred or required in and among polite society. One must at all times exhibit company manners if one is to make a good impression among the more influential members of society.
See also: company, manner

mind (one's) manners

To be well behaved and act appropriately. Make sure you mind your manners while you are with your Aunt Josephine. I don't want to hear about you giving her any trouble while I'm away!
See also: manner, mind

manners maketh man

A good man has a strong sense of morality. This phrase is typically attributed to 14th-century bishop William of Wykeham. To hear that so many of our students intervened to stop this crime restores my faith in the youth of the world. Manners maketh man, you know.
See also: maketh, man, manner

all kinds of

1. Many varieties or types of. You meet all kinds of people when you live in a big city. It's a huge store with all kinds of dresses—I'm sure you'll find one you like.
2. slang Extremely; very. Oh, their family is all kinds of dysfunctional! That movie was all kinds of awesome! I can't wait to see it again.
See also: all, kind, of

all manner of

Many varieties or types of. You meet all manner of people when you live in a big city. It's a huge store with all manner of dresses—I'm sure you'll find one you like.
See also: all, manner, of

by all means

1. Certainly; absolutely. By all means, come to our party if you end up being free on Saturday night!
2. In any way possible, regardless of risk or expense. There will be a lot of people at this event, but we need to court that one big investor by all means.
See also: all, by, mean

comport (oneself) with (something)

To act in a particular way. You need to comport yourself with class at the gala tonight, so please stay away from the bar.
See also: comport

devil-may-care attitude

A nonchalant attitude, especially toward risks or consequences. I can't believe he went out on his motorcycle in this rain. His devil-may-care attitude is going to get him killed. If you keep up this devil-may-care attitude toward your money, you'll be broke in no time.
See also: attitude

in a manner of speaking

In a way; in a sense; so to speak. He was a fixer, in a manner of speaking. A man who could get things done.
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

Coming naturally, as if accustomed from birth. She grew up in poverty, but since she became famous she has taken to rubbing shoulders with the upper crust as if to the manner born.
See also: born, manner

bedside manner

One's demeanor and behavior when interacting with patients, as of a medical professional, especially a doctor. Based on his bedside manner, I wonder if Dr. Smith is capable of feeling compassion at all. Her wonderful bedside manner was able to calm even the most agitated patients.
See also: manner

in the manner of (someone or something)

In the style or method typical of or usually associated with someone or something. He told us the news in the manner of someone who had just lost a loved one. Why wasn't he more excited? The tech company has started releasing incremental hardware updates, much in the manner of their largest competitor in the market.
See also: manner, of

different times, different manners

People of different generations or periods in history have different moral, ethical, or social standards or customs governing the way they speak, act, and interact. A: "Watching the horrible, blatant racism in old movies can be pretty startling." B: "different times, different manners, huh?" I can still remember when you'd be a pariah if you had a child out of wedlock, but these days it's nearly more common than not. different times, different manners, I suppose.
See also: different, manner

other times, other manners

People of different generations or periods in history have different moral, ethical, or social standards or customs governing the way they speak, act, and interact. A: "Watching the horrible, blatant racism in old movies can be pretty startling." B: "Other times, other manners, huh?" I can still remember when you'd be a pariah if you had a child out of wedlock, but these days it's nearly more common than not. Other times, other manners, I suppose.
See also: manner, other

resemble (someone or something) in (some manner or aspect)

To bear a resemblance to or seem quite like someone or something in some particular aspect, manner, or regard. It certainly resembles a classic '80s action film in its aesthetic and tone, but because it's being approximated, it just doesn't manage to feel authentic. A lot of people say I resemble my mother in my hard-headed resolve, which I always take as a compliment. He actually resembles the famous president in his peculiar manner of speaking.
See also: manner, resemble

forget (one's) manners

To act in a rude, impolite, or otherwise inappropriate way. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to reach across the table like that—I must have forgotten my manners for a minute there. How could you say something like that to me? Have you forgotten your manners?
See also: forget, manner

after the fashion of someone or something

 and after the style of someone or something
in the manner or style of someone or something. She walks down the street after the fashion of a grand lady. The parish church was built after the style of a French cathedral.
See also: after, fashion, of

*all kinds of someone or something

Fig. a great number of people or things; a great amount of something, especially money. (*Typically: be ~; have ~.) There were all kinds of people there, probably thousands. The Smith family has all kinds of money.
See also: all, kind, of

all manner of someone or something

Fig. all types of people or things. We saw all manner of people there. They came from every country in the world. They were selling all manner of things in the country store.
See also: all, manner, of

by all means

certainly; yes; absolutely. I will attempt to get there by all means. Bob: Can you come to dinner tomorrow? Jane: By all means. I'd love to.
See also: all, by, mean

comport oneself with some manner

to behave in a certain manner. I hope you are able to comport yourself with better behavior next time. The old man was able to comport himself with dignity.
See also: comport, manner

devil-may-care attitude

 and devil-may-care manner
a very casual attitude; a worry-free or carefree attitude. You must get rid of your devil-may-care attitude if you want to succeed. She acts so thoughtless—with her devil-may-care manner.
See also: attitude

equate

someone to someone else and equate something to something else to claim that someone is in some manner the same as someone else; to claim that something is in some manner the same as something else. I would equate Tom to Wallywhen it comes to native ability. You cannot equate my car to that jalopy you drive!

forget one's manners

to do something ill-mannered. Jimmy! Have we forgotten our manners?
See also: forget, manner

other times, other manners.

Prov. Different generations or eras have different customs. Amy thought her grandchildren addressed their friends in startlingly rude terms. "But then," she reflected, "other times, other manners." Jane: The young folks today are so shocking. Why, when I was their age, you wouldn't kiss your husband in public, let alone some of the things these children do! Alan: Other times, other manners.
See also: manner, other

all kinds of

1. Also, all manner or sorts of . All or many varieties of something, as in Before the banquet, they served all kinds of drinks, or He sold exotic fruit of all sorts, or The museum featured all manner of artifacts. [Early 1300s]
2. A large amount of something, as in She has all kinds of money. This hyperbolic usage is colloquial.
See also: all, kind, of

by all means

1. Also, by all manner of means. In every possible way, as in I plan to make use of him by all means. [Late 1400s]
2. Also, by all manner of means. Without fail, at any cost, as in Losing the contract is to be avoided by all means. [c. 1600]
3. Certainly, yes, as in Are you coming tonight?-By all means, I'll be there. [Late 1600s] Also see by any means; by no means.
See also: all, by, mean

company manners

One's best behavior, as in George never interrupts when we have guests; he has fine company manners. This term employs company in the sense of "guests." An older variant, Tell me thy company and I'll tell thee thy manners, uses company in the sense of "companions." The current term implies that one is more mindful of politeness with invited guests.
See also: company, manner

in a manner of speaking

In a way; so to speak. For example, He was, in a manner of speaking, asked to leave the group. [Late 1800s]
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

Accustomed from birth to a particular behavior or lifestyle, as in At a high-society function she behaves as though to the manner born, but we know she came from very humble circumstances . This term was invented by Shakespeare in Hamlet. Referring to the King's carousing in Danish style, Hamlet says (1:4): "Though I am native here And to the manner born, it is a custom More honor'd in the breach than the observance." The manner in this expression was later sometimes changed to manor, "the main house of an estate," and the idiom's sense became equated with "high-born" (and therefore accustomed to luxury), a way in which it is often used today.
See also: born, manner

bedside manner

a doctor's approach or attitude to a patient.
1993 Bill Moyers Healing & the Mind Are you just talking about the old-fashioned bedside manner of a doctor who comes around and visits you when you need him?
See also: manner

in a manner of speaking

in some sense; so to speak.
Manner of speaking is recorded from the mid 16th century; compare with French façon de parler , which has been in use in English since the early 19th century.
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

naturally at ease in a specified way of life, job, or situation.
This comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet: ‘though I am native here And to the manner born’. Punning on this expression, to the manor born is used to refer to someone who has aristocratic origins.
See also: born, manner

all ˈmanner of somebody/something

many different types of people or things: The problem can be solved in all manner of ways.

in the manner of somebody/something

(formal) in a style that is typical of somebody/something: a painting in the manner of Raphael

in a ˌmanner of ˈspeaking

if you think about it in a certain way: ‘Are they married?’ ‘In a manner of speaking — they’ve lived together for 15 years.’
See also: manner, of, speaking

(as if) to the ˌmanner ˈborn

(formal) as if a job, a social position, etc. were completely natural to you: He rides round in a Rolls Royce as if to the manner born.
See also: born, manner

by ˈall means

(spoken) used to say that you are very willing for somebody to have something or do something: ‘Can I smoke?’ ‘By all means.’‘Do you think I could borrow this dictionary?’ ‘Yes, by all means.’
See also: all, by, mean

all kinds of

Informal
Plenty of; ample: We have all kinds of time to finish the job.
See also: all, kind, of

in a manner of speaking

In a way; so to speak.
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

Accustomed to a position, custom, or lifestyle from or as if from birth.
See also: born, manner

by all means

Without fail; certainly.
See also: all, by, mean

by all manner of means

In every possible way. The phrase all manner of has meant “all sorts of ” since the 1700s, so basically this redundant-sounding cliché would mean “by all sorts of methods.” However, the same sense could be achieved in “by all means”—that is, “by all methods.”
See also: all, by, manner, mean, of

to the manner/manor born

Used to elegance and luxury. This term originated with Shakespeare, who in Hamlet (1.4) wrote, “Though I am native here, And to the manner born,—it is a custom more honour’d in the breach than the observance.” Although Hamlet was discussing his father’s corpse waking and carousing, so that manner here simply means “way of doing things,” it later was often corrupted to manor, meaning the home of the well-to-do, and so the expression came to mean high-born and therefore accustomed to the best of everything. O. Henry played with it in The Venturers (1910): “He ordered dinner with the calm deliberation of one who was to the menu born.” A delightful British television comedy series of the 1970s may have helped preserve the cliché with its title To the Manor Born, but it may be dying out nevertheless.
See also: born, manner, manor

manner born

Familiar with such things. The phrase comes from Hamlet: “But to my mind, though I am native here. And to the manner born, it is a custom / More honour'd in the breach than the observance.” The widespread confusion between “manner and “manor” has been going on for at least two centuries. “To the manor born,” in the sense of accustomed to luxury as if raised in an aristocratic environment, was used as the title of a British sitcom that achieved some popularity on American public television.
See also: born, manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Once again, President Duterte shows his crude manner of speaking by asserting 'freedom of expression' as his justification for expressing himself in public without regard to decency ('Du30 says women misunderstand him; 'chief misogynist' still rates high,' 3/13/19) .
Arif Alvi has said that the Parliament has an important role in supporting Election Commission to hold general elections in a more transparent, free and fair manner.
Why learning 'Good manner' today is becoming more important than ever.
A 28-year-old man who behaved in a threatening manner at a Dumfries housing estate has been made the subject of a community payback order at the town's sheriff court.
And after police detained him the 38-year-old made sectarian remarks during a journey from Balfron to the police station At Stirling Sheriff Court, Leishman had admitted two charges - one of acting in a racially aggravated manner, and the other of behaving in a threatening and abusive manner aggravated by religious prejudice.
Through a derivative of "old school" bedside manner, we explore the concept of deskside manner as an emerging practice that can help foster enhanced stability for tertiary students, particularly in the transition phase.
Is the expression to the manner born or to the manor born?
Some of us may like to have an example of how one can behave in a manner that spoils his image/career.
William Hanson, a senior etiquette tutor at The English Manner, which specialises in teaching manners and etiquette, agrees that manners aren't as good as they once were - and not just among children.
The English Manner, which specialises in teaching manners and etiquette and has a school in Dubai, agrees that people, not just children, don't have the manners of past generations.
It's her manner when she knows she's got you; no need for flash or sass or for too much in the way of Johnsonian syntactic mastery.
The total want of all the usual courtesies of the table, the voracious rapidity with which the viands were seized and devoured, the strange uncouth phrases and pronunciation; the loathsome spitting, from the contamination of which it was absolutely impossible to protect our dresses, the frightful manner of feeding with their knives, till the whole blade seemed to enter into the mouth; and the still more frightful manner of cleaning the teeth afterwards with a pocket knife, soon forced us to feel that we were not surrounded by the generals, colonels and majors of the old-world.
Manner Inc., a subsidiary of Manner Resins of Annapolis, Md., has collected and recycled 10 million pounds of burlap, the company said.
1 : in a sympathetic manner <The principal treated him kindly.>
Many educators, researchers and parents continue to complain that today's youth--and even many adults too--are unable to act in a civil manner. The advent of technology and the "I want it now" philosophy have made people forget their manners.