manna from heaven, like

manna from heaven

An unexpected benefit or assistance, especially when it comes at the time when it is needed most. The phrase is a reference to the Biblical story of the food that God miraculously provided to the Israelites as they wandered in the wilderness. I had no idea we would be getting a bonus this year, but it was like manna from heaven—just in time to pay some of my holiday bills. Having my family near me during this tragedy has been manna from heaven for me.
See also: heaven, manna
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

manna from heaven

Fig. unexpected help or comfort. (A biblical reference.) The arrival of the rescue team was like manna from heaven to the injured climber. The offer of a new job just as she had been fired was manna from heaven to Joan.
See also: heaven, manna
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

manna from heaven

An unexpected aid, advantage, or assistance, as in After all the criticism in the media, that favorable evaluation was like manna from heaven . This expression alludes to the food ( manna) that miraculously appears to feed the Israelites on their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land (Exodus 16:15).
See also: heaven, manna
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

manna from ˈheaven

something unexpected, for example a gift of money, which comes to help you when you are in difficulties: That cheque for £1 000 from my aunt came like manna from heaven as I had three or four big bills to pay.This phrase comes from the Bible. Manna was the food the Israelites found in the desert.
See also: heaven, manna
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

manna from heaven, like

Any sudden or unexpected advantage or help. The word manna is used in the Bible, in Exodus (16:15), where it means a miraculous food that suddenly appears to succor the children of Israel on their journey from Egypt to the Holy Land. Exactly what it meant is no longer known, but it may have been a corruption of the Egyptian word mennu, the sweet, waxy exudation of the tamarisk tree. In English the term came to mean an unexpected welcome gift from heaven or some other benevolent source. It was already being used humorously in the early eighteenth century by Matthew Green (1696–1737), who wrote (in The Spleen), “Or to some coffeehouse I stray, for news, the manna of a day.”
See also: like, manna
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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