manage

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get in

1. To access or enter some place. No, I forgot my key, so I can't get in.
2. To reach some destination. What time does your plane get in? It's a long drive, so we won't get in until after midnight.
3. To be admitted into something, often an academic institution. She applied to some really good schools, but with her grades, I'm afraid she won't get in.
4. To use one's position or influence to cause someone to gain admittance to some organization or place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "in." I heard you were a member of that club. Do you think you could get me in? I'm on the list for tonight's show, so I can probably get you in, too.
5. To manage to do something within a specific time frame. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "in." I just need to get in another five minutes of sleep before the alarm goes off again. I always like to get in a few more reps before the end of my workout.
6. To reach a particular state or condition. I'm trying to get in shape for the wedding, but I hate going to the gym.
7. To join or become a part of something. We need to get in on Joe's latest money-making scheme! Don't worry about getting in with the popular kids at school—just focus on your studies.
See also: get

manage with (someone or something)

To be able to operate, function, or carry on adequately with a smaller amount of people or things than one had anticipated. Terry called in sick at the last minute, so I guess we'll have to manage with just three people tomorrow. Commercial airplanes are designed to be able to manage with a single engine if the other one fails.
See also: manage

manage without (someone or something)

To be able to operate, function, or carry on adequately without a particular person or thing. Look, it will be tough, but we've managed without a second income before, and we'll find a way to do it again. If that's your attitude, Jerry, then you can just leave. The team will manage just fine without you.
See also: manage, without

get someone in(to) something

 
1. Lit. to manage to put someone into a confining area or into clothing. I couldn't get Billy into his boots!
2. Fig. to manage to get someone enrolled into a school, club, organization, class, etc.; to manage to get someone accepted into something. Somehow, we managed to get Jody into a fine private school. We got her in the group at last! Well, I managed to get myself into the class I wanted.
See also: get

get someone or something in(to) something

 and get someone or something in
to manage to fit someone or something into something. I will try to get you into the beginning of the line. The key is bent, but I think I can get it in. He struggled to get in the key.
See also: get

get something in(to) someone

to make something enter someone or something. Get that morphine into her before she goes into shock. Let's get some food into him. He looks starved.
See also: get

get something in(to) something

to manage to put something into something. I got the notice into tomorrow's newspaper. I will get the replacement battery into the car right away.
See also: get

manage with someone or something

to do as well as possible with only someone or something (less than one had hoped for). We wanted Kelly to help us, but we will manage with Larry. I am sure we can manage with the money that we have.
See also: manage

manage without someone or something

to do as well as possible without someone or something. Carla said that she just can't manage without Jerry. We just can't manage without some more money.
See also: manage, without

get in

1. Enter a place, as in We managed to get in just before the doors closed. [First half of 1500s]
2. Arrive, as in We got in late last night. [Early 1600s]
3. Be elected to office or become accepted, as in a club. For example, Marge asked the club if she could get in. The variant get into takes an object, as in Things changed after he got into office. [Late 1500s]
4. Succeed in including, delivering, or finishing something, as in Can you get in that last paragraph? or I hope you'll get it in on time. Also see get in with.
See also: get

get in

v.
1. To enter something: Please get in the back seat. We opened the door of the car and got in.
2. To arrive: He got in late last night.
3. To become accepted to some institution, such as a school or club: I applied to cooking school and, fortunately, I got in.
4. To cause someone or something to come to or be admitted to a place: Please get the children in before noon. The standards of the school are high, but your good grades will get you in.
5. To succeed in making or doing something within a restricted period of time: The milk truck got six deliveries in before noon. The postal carrier got in the entire route before 2:00.
6. To attain some condition, especially unwittingly: The hooligans got in trouble for disrupting the picnic.
7. To put something into some condition: We got the car in good condition for the long trip. The runner got in great shape for the marathon.
8. get in on To gain access to or knowledge of something: At the dance club, we got in on the latest dance moves. Everybody wanted to get in on the secret.
9. get in with To become involved with something, especially with some group: She got in with a bad group of people.
See also: get
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessing and maintaining the highest underwriting skill levels, as well as providing additional training and education, are good for both the employee and the managing general underwriter A process of evaluating ability and matching appropriate individual levels of authority reinforces the underwriting system.
* Program management, which is not just workflow, but involves managing the product creation, production, and data dissemination process itself.
A financial holding company must maintain and make available to the Board upon request a written record describing its involvement in routinely managing or operating a portfolio company.
Preparation for managing a weapons of mass destruction incident first requires an appreciation of the magnitude of the potential consequences.
* ensuring the performance of the company fulfills those values so that stakeholders' experiences of the company equal the identity claims (by managing the organisational performance)
Targeted use of technology can be our tactical advantage in managing work force diversity.
Even its advocates concede that "managing diversity" is an ambitious, high-risk enterprise.
"Letting nature take its course" denies the widespread and important role of Indians in managing vegetation and wildlife, demeans their cultures and intelligence, and creates a false separation between people and nature.
A challenge for managing the retention process is to examine each possible storage location and decide on policies for its use.
At the same time, the risks of mismanaging recorded information are high, and the need to 'align technologies for managing recorded information with enterprise-planning initiatives is great.
Based on regulatory and legislative requirements, IT organizations must develop a plan for managing and retaining data for as long as it is required, and then disposing of the data when it is no longer needed.
Managing all projects in one place, Prolog LT reduces project delays and mistakes otherwise inevitable when using multiple spreadsheets, word processing documents and hand written files," said Bodrozic.
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